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Record-breaking bids for African art, South Africa's #NotInMyName anti-domestic violence protests and more.

DIASPORA—Artwork by African artists earned record-setting bids at the Sotheby's fine art auction in London, BBC Africa reports.


Earth Developing More Roots by acclaimed Ghanaian artist El Anatsui sold for just under a million dollars, while Sunflowers by South African painter Irma Stern was bought for $540,000.

The next highest bid was for Yinka Shonibare's Crash Willy at $290,000.

 

NIGERIA—A single Chibok girl was able to escape Boko Haram and return home on Wednesday (May 17), says presidential advisor Femi Adesina to the BBC. She was reportedly found by Nigerian troops.

Eighty-two girls returned home earlier this month after a negation was brokered by the International Rescue Committee.

SOUTH AFRICA—A social media campaign in South Africa is urging men to get involved in a protest to help address gender-based violence in the country. #NotInMyName is the hashtag being used to gather South African men for a demonstration at the Union Buildings in Pretoria on Saturday (May 20).

The call to action comes in response to the pervasive killings of South African women, often at the hand of their partners. Last month, 22-year-old, Karabo Mokoena, was killed and set on fire by her boyfriend. The incident ignited a conversation about gender-based violence around the hashtag #MenAreTrash.

NIGERIA—Protestors have taken to the streets of Abuja to urge the government to act on behalf on Nigerians currently imprisoned in China.

According to a letter from organizers at the Black African Reorientation and Development Organization, "over 6,000 Nigerians are currently in various Chinese prisons. The facts show that over 55% are unlawfully and illegally being incarcerated."

Read more on this via BBC Africa.

UGANDA—A Ugandan entrepreneur, wants to take the Ugandan sport of kwepena to the Olympics. The sport which translates to "dancing" is widely played by Ugandan youth and involves a soft ball being thrown at opponents similar to the way dodge ball is played. If

The man behind the mission, Simon Tumukunde, has worked to formalize the game by creating official rules and guidelines.

“We looked at kwepena as a traditional game that was played years and years back by our grandparents – and, maybe, by the little girls right now – and we realized that it’s a game that is also overlooked," he told Urban Television.

We were like: I think we can redesign this game! I think we can add a few things to make it professional.”

Read more about this story here.

 

 

 

News
Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

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We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

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Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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