Arts + Culture

7 African Sauce Brands That You Need to Try

Here are seven brands making the African sauces we love.

DIASPORA—If you're like us, then you craving African cuisine all the time. With so many unique delicacies to offer, there's no denying that our food is everything.


Up until recently, it was hard to get a taste of African food without relying on mom to make everything from scratch. But that's changing, as more and more black-owned brands are focusing on providing simple, ready-to-serve products that give us that authentic taste we're yearning for in a quick and easy way.

Below are seven brands making African sauces that are certainly worth trying if you're craving a taste of egusi, jollof, chili sauce and more.

2 Sisters Shitoh

This brand, owned by "two spicy sisters serving up slow-simmered hot sauce from Ghana," offers Ghanian shito in fun, ready-to-serve bottles. If you're in the mood for some "make your nose run" spiciness, be sure to try out 2 Sisters Shitoh. Visit their Instagram page to place an order.

Basbaas

Hawa Hassan created this line of Somali condiments in order to introduce the world to the flavors of her heritage. Basbass is named after the Somali word for chili. Hassan's line ranges from flavor-packed hot sauces to savory chutneys. You can order some of her products here.

Akabanga Rwandan Chili Oil

This popular chili oil, has made a millionaire out of its founder, Sina Gerard. The entrepreneur started selling food by the road and became known for his Akabanga "chili sauce." He's now the county's most well-known businessman. and hopes to transform Rwanda's agricultural sector. "My aim is to make sure Rwandan farmers, because they are rated at 90 percent, feel proud to be farmers," he told CNN. "I'm sure I'll achieve it because so far I have achieved a lot." Purchase the oil via the online store.

Photo by Aaron Leaf.

Afro Fusion Cuisine

This line of West African and Jamaican inspired sauces is prepared by Wisconsin-based chef, Yollande Tchouapi Deacon, who also owns the Afro-Caribbean restaurant Irie Zulu. Their sauces include, "Jollof Tomato Herb Sauce," "M'Chuzi Peanut Coconut Curry Sauce" and " Mafe West African Peanut Sauce." You can purchase Afro Fusion Cuisine online, and in local spots in Chicago and Wisconsin.

Brother Bru Bru

California-based Bother Bru Bru began producing his line of Afrocentric, health-conscious hot sauces after being diagnosed with high blood pressure at the age of 50. "He was determined to put some joy back into his diet, so he started experimenting, researching, collecting and blending peppers and spices," reads his bio. He lists a number of health benefits associated with his hot sauces and has a pretty cool backstory as well: he played with Hugh Masekela and Olatunji among others before becoming a food connoisseur. His sauces pair well with almost any meal. Check here for information on where to purchase.

MaRobert's the Taste of Tanzania

This brand offering "the taste of Tanzania" was created by Tanzanian entrepreneur Maggie Mazoleka. Their product line includes medium hot, hot, and extra hot Pilli Pilli sauce, "fruity sauce," chili sauce and more, made with all-natural ingredients. You can purchase MaRobert's online via their website.

pretty pictures of tasty sauces #edinburghfoody #local #TheTasteofTanzania #PamojaTogether #chillisauce
A post shared by Maggie Mazoleka (@marobertssauce) on

Pepper & Stew

Though egusi stew is usually made from scratch, using a packet of melon seeds, this London-based line, created by Zimbabwean chef and blogger, Racquel Mafura-Roberts, offers the one-of-a-kind egusi sauce, pre-made and served in a bottle. If you're looking to experiment with new products and looking for a hassle-free way to do so, give Pepper & Stew a try. Also, try their jolly sauce and "South African Cape Malay Curry." You can buy their sauces, here.

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Understandably, heartfelt tributes have been pouring in ever since. Long before it was cool (or even legal) to be in close proximity to blackness and anything attached to it in South Africa, Clegg, a white man, was doing just that. That is exactly why he was given the endearing title of South Africa's "son of the soil."

Growing up during Apartheid, Clegg was taught how to speak the Zulu language by a domestic worker named Charlie Mzila. In his teenage years, his appreciation for the Zulu culture continued and he soon learnt the traditional dance styles known as isishameni and also learnt how to play the Maskandi guitar. Clegg's music was a beacon of light during a very dark time in South Africa's history and his songs about Nelson Mandela (at a time where songs were banned for merely mentioning the name of the late statesman and other key struggle activists) brought the country together.

It is irrefutable that a music giant has fallen. However, Clegg leaves behind a wealth of music featuring other great South African artists and groups such as Zakwe, Brenda Fassie, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela and Juluka/Suvuka, among several others. His music undeniably brought South Africans and people all around the world together.

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Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

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Shot in the Havasu Falls in Arizona's Grand Canyon, Beyoncé and her legion of beautiful dancers are one with nature and its various elements as she beckons us to be brave and hear the calling of spirit. As we noted when she announced the album, the track opens with a call and response in Swahili that translates to "Long live the king": Uishi kwa mda mrefu mfalme—uishi kwa.

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