Arts + Culture

7 African Sauce Brands That You Need to Try

Here are seven brands making the African sauces we love.

DIASPORA—If you're like us, then you craving African cuisine all the time. With so many unique delicacies to offer, there's no denying that our food is everything.


Up until recently, it was hard to get a taste of African food without relying on mom to make everything from scratch. But that's changing, as more and more black-owned brands are focusing on providing simple, ready-to-serve products that give us that authentic taste we're yearning for in a quick and easy way.

Below are seven brands making African sauces that are certainly worth trying if you're craving a taste of egusi, jollof, chili sauce and more.

2 Sisters Shitoh

This brand, owned by "two spicy sisters serving up slow-simmered hot sauce from Ghana," offers Ghanian shito in fun, ready-to-serve bottles. If you're in the mood for some "make your nose run" spiciness, be sure to try out 2 Sisters Shitoh. Visit their Instagram page to place an order.

Basbaas

Hawa Hassan created this line of Somali condiments in order to introduce the world to the flavors of her heritage. Basbass is named after the Somali word for chili. Hassan's line ranges from flavor-packed hot sauces to savory chutneys. You can order some of her products here.

Akabanga Rwandan Chili Oil

This popular chili oil, has made a millionaire out of its founder, Sina Gerard. The entrepreneur started selling food by the road and became known for his Akabanga "chili sauce." He's now the county's most well-known businessman. and hopes to transform Rwanda's agricultural sector. "My aim is to make sure Rwandan farmers, because they are rated at 90 percent, feel proud to be farmers," he told CNN. "I'm sure I'll achieve it because so far I have achieved a lot." Purchase the oil via the online store.

Photo by Aaron Leaf.

Afro Fusion Cuisine

This line of West African and Jamaican inspired sauces is prepared by Wisconsin-based chef, Yollande Tchouapi Deacon, who also owns the Afro-Caribbean restaurant Irie Zulu. Their sauces include, "Jollof Tomato Herb Sauce," "M'Chuzi Peanut Coconut Curry Sauce" and " Mafe West African Peanut Sauce." You can purchase Afro Fusion Cuisine online, and in local spots in Chicago and Wisconsin.

Brother Bru Bru

California-based Bother Bru Bru began producing his line of Afrocentric, health-conscious hot sauces after being diagnosed with high blood pressure at the age of 50. "He was determined to put some joy back into his diet, so he started experimenting, researching, collecting and blending peppers and spices," reads his bio. He lists a number of health benefits associated with his hot sauces and has a pretty cool backstory as well: he played with Hugh Masekela and Olatunji among others before becoming a food connoisseur. His sauces pair well with almost any meal. Check here for information on where to purchase.

MaRobert's the Taste of Tanzania

This brand offering "the taste of Tanzania" was created by Tanzanian entrepreneur Maggie Mazoleka. Their product line includes medium hot, hot, and extra hot Pilli Pilli sauce, "fruity sauce," chili sauce and more, made with all-natural ingredients. You can purchase MaRobert's online via their website.

pretty pictures of tasty sauces #edinburghfoody #local #TheTasteofTanzania #PamojaTogether #chillisauce
A post shared by Maggie Mazoleka (@marobertssauce) on

Pepper & Stew

Though egusi stew is usually made from scratch, using a packet of melon seeds, this London-based line, created by Zimbabwean chef and blogger, Racquel Mafura-Roberts, offers the one-of-a-kind egusi sauce, pre-made and served in a bottle. If you're looking to experiment with new products and looking for a hassle-free way to do so, give Pepper & Stew a try. Also, try their jolly sauce and "South African Cape Malay Curry." You can buy their sauces, here.

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Photo courtesy of Doble Seis Entertainment

Burna Boy, Teni, AKA, Sho Madjozi, Mr Eazi & More Earn 2019 BET Award Nominations

This year's "Best International Act" categories are stacked with some of the biggest names in African pop.

The nominees for this year's BET Awards have been announced, and one again, some of the biggest names in African pop have been named in the " International Act" categories.

This year, Nigerian acts Burna Boy, Mr Eazi have been nominated in the "Best International Act" category. They've each had standout years, with both artists performing at the Coachella Music Festival this year.

They're nominated alongside South African star rapper AKA, who won a Kids' Choice Award earlier this year for "Favorite South African Star," and the French-Malian pop singer and one of OkayAfrica's 100 Women Aya Nakamura. French-Cameroonian and Togolese rapper Dosseh and UK rappers Dave, and Giggs round out the heavily-stacked category.

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This New Documentary Sheds Light On the History of a Beloved Nigerian Staple—Agege Bread

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This new documentary following Nigeria's own Agege Bread contributes to the need of preserving and documenting food culture on the continent.

In Fresh Agege Bread, directed and produced by filmmaker Chika Okoli of FABA (For Africans By Africans), we follow food researcher Ozoz Sokoh as she traces the history and popularity of Agege Bread featuring its pioneering bakers, community figureheads and locals. The documentary touches on the rise of the booming product as well as addresses some of the controversies around the health and safety measures applied in the production of this staple.

For Okoli, the inability to find such insights about this significant food in Nigerian culture is what inspired her to develop this documentary.

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amA picture taken on May 17, 2019 in Berlin shows a Stone Cross, a key 15th-century navigation landmark erected by Portuguese explorers, seen at the History Museum in Berlin. (Photo: TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Germany to Return Stolen 15th Century Stone Cross to Namibia

Germany's Culture Minister says the move is a "clear sign" that the country is committed to coming to terms with its colonial past.

In the latest development in the movement towards African art repatriation, the German government will return a 15th-century Portuguese stone cross that has been in its possession since the colonial era, back to its original home in Namibia.

The cross was a navigation landmark placed on the coastline of present-day Namibia in 1496, before it was taken in the late 17th century under German colonial rule, BBC Africa reports.

The Namibian government put out a request for its return back in 2017, and the request was formally approved today by the Berlin Museum. The cross is set to be returned in August, according to a statement from the museum.

READ: Taking Back Our History: Understanding African Art Repatriation

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