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The African Power Players Named in Paradise Papers Leaks

The paradise papers are a snapshot of a global elite living outside the rules

The Paradise Papers consist of 13.4 million leaked documents detailing how the global elite hide their wealth in offshore tax havens. Like the Panama Papers before it, the research into the database was coordinated by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists alongside dozens of partner publications. The bulk of the documents come from the law firm Appleby, based in Bermuda—the picturesque island with lax tax laws that give the Paradise Papers its name.


On their site, the ICIJ have compiled an interactive list of many of the power players found in the documents. And while there are some notable African names on the list, it's a truly global roster of bigwigs from former Canadian Prime Ministers, to Trump associates and most notably the Queen of England.

As the ICIJ warns on their site:

There are legitimate uses for offshore companies and trusts. We do not intend to suggest or imply that any people, companies or other entities included in the ICIJ Offshore Leaks Database have broken the law or otherwise acted improperly. Many people and entities have the same or similar names. We suggest you confirm the identities of any individuals or entities located in the database based on addresses or other identifiable information. If you find an error in the database please get in touch with us.

Check out some of the names of those implicated below and hit the link to take you to their profiles on the ICIJ site:

Sam Kahamba Kutesa

Sally Kosgei

John Mahama

Hakainde Sammy Hichilema

Bukola Saraki

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

Ahmad Ali al-Mirghani

Hosni Mubarak

Mohammed VI of Morocco

John Agyekum Kufuor

Lansana Conté

Jacob Zuma

Laurent Gbagbo

Jaynet Désirée Kabila Kyungu

José Maria Botelho de Vasconcelos

Bruno Jean-Richard Itoua

Emmanuel Ndahiro

James Ibori

Attan Shansonga

Kofi Annan

Karim Wade

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Photo: Aisha Asamany

How Relocating to Ghana Helped Reinvigorate Jewelry Designer Aisha Asamany's Work

Moving to Ghana gave Aisha Asamany's luxury jewelry brand, inspired by Adinkra symbols that traditionally project strength, fearlessness, love and power, renewed verve to tell personal stories of her growing clientele.

In 2019, the government of Ghana made a global splash with its Year of Return initiative – the campaign sought to encourage the African diaspora to return home to the continent, specifically to Ghana.

Linked to the 400th year commemoration of the first recorded landing of slaves in the United States, it became a launchpad for the Ghanaian government to convince Black people around the world to permanently settle in the West African country.

Aisha Asamany, a corporate management consultant for high-profile UK financial institutions turned self-taught luxury jewelry designer was one of many who heeded the call, trading in the corporate life for a spiritual and an entrepreneurial journey – one of joy, appreciation, and representation in her fatherland.

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