Audio
Afro Soca mixtape cover. Photo by Sean Maung.

You Need To Hear This New 'Afro Soca' Mixtape

DJ Jam Central lays down an extensive journey into the cross-continental sounds of 'Afro Soca' for LargeUp's Mixtape Series .

'Afro Soca' is the new hybrid of African and Caribbean sounds that has been taking over dance floors on both sides of the Atlantic. The style lives at the intersection of afrobeats and soca, as heard in genre crossovers and collaborations like Runtown, Wizkid & Walshy Fire's “Bend Down Pause" and Olatunji's “Oh Yay."


In this new mixtape, DJ Jam Central lays down an extensive journey into the cross-continental sounds of 'Afro Soca' for the first installment of LargeUp's Mix Series. Speaking to LargeUp on the early origins of the genre DJ Jam Central mentions:

"I will say it began in the 70s with Ras Shorty when he created soca music, fusing African rhythms and calypso with Indian rhythms. If you look at a lot of Ras Shorty songs from early, it had heavy African riddims...Of late, I started noticing when Machel did “Possessed" with Ladysmith Black Mambazo. That stood out to show that this is a direction the music was going and then Olatunji [when] he directed his imagery and everything towards being very Afrocentric."

The term 'Afro Soca' was initially coined by dancer, choreographer, and original Fela! cast member Shakira Marshall (who graces the mixtape's cover art) for her Brooklyn dance class.

Stream LargeUp Mix Series Vol. 1: Afro Soca Mixed By DJ Jam Central below and see the full track list underneath.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Watch Focalistic & Vigro Deep’s New Music Video For ‘Ke Star’

The 'Lockdown Level 1 anthem' has come to life through fire visuals.