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South African Photographer Alexia Webster's Street Studios From The DRC, South Africa & Madagascar

South African photographer Alexia Webster's street studio portraits of women in the DRC, South Africa and Madagascar are on view in NYC.

All images courtesy of the International Center of Photography


South African photographer Alexia Webster is one of ten women exhibiting in Take Ten, a new photo exhibition at the School at ICP (the International Center of Photography) in New York City. Co-curated by ICP alumnus Nancy Borowick and Alison Morley, the exhibit showcases the multi-media of ten female photographers whose work looks at critical issues women and children experience around the world, including sex trafficking, personal identity and beauty standards, and workplace discrimination. "From Jessie Tarbox Beals to Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White, women demonstrated the tenacity and dedication required to envision and carry out long-form reportage, whether their subject was the Dust Bowl or prison life or war," Morley said in a press release. Webster’s contribution to the exhibition is a series of portraits of women taken in street studios in the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Africa and Madagascar. To create her studios Webster erected domestic props– rugs, a sofa, artificial house plants, and curtains, for example– in a variety of public environments, including a street corner, a refugee camp, and a rock quarry. "Having photographed in a number of refugee camps across the African continent, I believe that it is in these places that my project would have most meaning," the Johannesburg-born photographer said in a statement on Artraker about her refugee camp portraits. "Being spaces of uncertainty and transience, the family object is even more powerful and helps support a sense of identity and belonging where it is needed most.”

Alexia Webster's street studio portraits are on view at Take Ten at the School at ICP through March 15, 2015. For more of Webster's work, follow her via her blog, site, and Instagram.

Interview

This Compilation Shines a Light On East African Underground Music

We talk to a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation from Uganda's Nyege Nyege.

Nyege Nyege, a label in Kampala, Uganda is channelling the confidence brimming over a whole continent. Africa is no longer the future. For dance music, its time is right now.

Music For the Eagles is a compilation released in conjunction with Soundcloud to showcase the best new acts that East Africa has to offer outside the mainstream. A new wave of artists firmly blasting non-conformist energy for you to spasm to. Music that takes you places. Otim Alpha's high BPM wedding frenzy of incessant rasping vocals accompanied by feverous violin will have you clawing the walls to oblivion. Anti Vairas' dancehall from a battleship with super galactic intentions doesn't even break a sweat as it ruins you. FLO's beautiful sirens call, is a skittish and detuned nursery rhyme that hints at a yearning for love but reveals something far more unnerving. Ecko Bazz's tough spiralling vocal over sub-bass and devil trap energy is an anthem that can only be bewailed. And Kidane Fighter's tune is more trance-like prayer. These are only some of the highlights for you to shake it out to.

We got to chat with a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation as they took a break from the studio below.

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