Events
Clockwise: Honorees Wangechi Mutu, Congresswoman Karen Bass, Gerald Lenoir and BAJI executive director and Black Lives Matter co-founder Opal Tometi. Photos courtesy of BAJI.

Black Alliance For Just Immigration Celebrates 10 Years Of Advocating For Immigration Rights

BAJI commemorates 10 years of just immigration work for black migrants this Saturday.

The Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI) is hosting the 10-year celebration of their continued fight for immigration justice this Saturday. Black Lives Matter co-founder and BAJI executive director, Opal Tometi, will be joined by host Gina Belafonte to recognize five honorees for their transformative work.


For Tometi, the following leaders support BAJI's mission through their continued work to make sure Black Americans are provided the ability to flourish through safe passage:

Wangechi Mutu: Kenyan artist and founder of Africa's Out

Gerald Lenoir: BAJI founding director and founding steering committee member of the Black Immigration Network

Congresswoman Karen Bass: Represents California's 37th congressional district and serves on the House Judiciary Committee and House Committee of Foreign Affairs

Gerry Hudson: Executive vice president of the Service Employees International Union

Neo Philanthropy's Four Freedoms Fund: Strengthens immigrant-led organizations and coalitions

“BAJI is the only organization in the country ensuring Black immigrants have a fair and just experience here in the U.S.," Tometi says in a statement. “We have provided tens of thousands of immigrants important training and resources through our Black Immigration Network (BIN) program."

BAJI, founded in 2006, hopes this event will raise the resources needed to grow the organization's national operations. It will take place on Saturday, April 9, at the California African American Museum. For more information, head here.

Audio
Image via Sheila Afari PR.

9 Black Electronic Musicians You Should Be Listening To

Featuring DJ Lag, Spellling, Nozinja, Klein, LSDXOXO and more.

We know that Black queer DJs from the Midwest are behind the creation of house and dance music. Yet, a look at the current electronic scene will find it terribly whitewashed and gentrified, with the current prominent acts spinning tracks sung by unnamed soulful singers from time to time. Like many art forms created by Black people all over the world, the industry hasn't paid homage to its pioneers, despite the obvious influence they have. Thankfully, the independent music scene is thriving with many Black acts inspired by their forefathers and mothers who are here to revolutionize electronic music. Here are a list of the ones you should check out:

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