Audio

Batuk Share The Thumping Anti-War Protest Song 'Gira'

Spoek Mathambo, Aero Manyelo and Manteiga's Batuk collective returns with the third single off 'Musica da Terra'

Batuk's Aero Manyelo, Manteiga and Spoek Mathambo. Source: Facebook
Batuk make pan-African house music. For South African producers Spoek Mathambo, Aero Manyelo and artist/vocalist Manteiga, house music is a vehicle to connect the African diaspora through rhythm culture and language.

Today, on Freedom Day in South Africa, the collective returns with the overtly political third single off their forthcoming debut album, Musica da Terra. On the protest song “Gira” (a portuguese word meaning to change or turn around), the group calls on Africa’s younger generations to put a stop to conflict across the continent. “Addressing the constant war and fighting in Africa, the song is born of dance floor culture, but not of it’s typical hedonistic nature,” Batuk states. “There are currently fifteen African countries involved in war, or are experiencing post-war conflict and tension. The statistics are not only shocking/frightening…the time has come for CHANGE.”


The song’s unofficial visuals are an anti-war montage submitted to Batuk by a fan who, inspired by a live performance of “Gira,” dug through his trove of documentaries and stock footage to piece together a homemade music video for the band.

Watch the group’s fanmade video and stream their full Gira EP below, featuring a pair of remixes by the Durban-based Gqom trio Rudeboyz and Johannesburg’s DJ Eltonnick. Musica da Terra is out May 27th on Teka Recordings.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Watch Focalistic & Vigro Deep’s New Music Video For ‘Ke Star’

The 'Lockdown Level 1 anthem' has come to life through fire visuals.