Best of 2016

The Best African Memes of 2016

Laugh with us into 2017 with our best African memes of 2016.

You know your social media timelines and meme folders on your smartphones aren't complete until you come across some African memes.


It's still mind blowing to think about how quick young Africans turn trending topics and current events around to make our stomachs hurt in laughter.

This was very difficult list to narrow down—but take a look at our favorite African memes of 2016 below.

Keep up with Okayafrica's 2016 'Best Ofs' here.

The #BidoungChallenge:

This hashtag became a thing when a photo capturing Pierre Ismael Bidoung Mpkatt, Cameroon's sports minister, did the absolute most when he greeted President Paul Biya went viral.

Put Some Respeck on Ghana Jollof:

Birdman never saw the end of it when he rolled through the Breakfast Club and demanded they put respeck on his name. Here's Dulo's hilarious take on the exchange.

Desiigner's 'Panda' by Your Nigerian Dad:

A perfect example of what African parents hear when they listen to Desiigner.

#IfAfricaWasASchool:

Probably one of the funniest hashtags on African Twitter, #IfAfricaWasASchool gave us a witty perspective on the complex dynamics of the continent.

This Clip That We Finally Found the Original Movie To:

A video posted by hoodclips (@hoodclips) on

Nollywood star Chinedu Ikedieze (aka Aki) performs an emotional scene in the film, Intelligent Students. The weeping with a machete in tow is all for his alcoholic father who stole the money he was saving up to take an exam with his brother (see the full scene here). But because of the internet, his weeping symbolizes so many other moments, including the one above.

When you speak English in the House:

A video posted by edd3yo (@edd3yo) on

I would argue that Edd3yo is one of the most underrated comedians on social media. This skit shows just that as he portrays the quintessential Ghanaian father so accurately.

The Jake Meme:

A photo of a studious child from the Asempanaye village in Ghana broke the internet this year—but the virality (yes, I'm sure that's not a real word too) of the image shows us how much we get caught up in the laughs without looking at the big picture. The photo was taken by Carlos Cortes, a videographer and photographer who followed Chicago-based Ghanaian artist, Solomon Adufah, to Ghana last summer, where he mentored and taught art to the children of that village. Adufah seized the attention and began a campaign to raise funds to continue to do his good work, and to support their dreams of continuing school.

Igwe 2Pac Returns:

Nollywood will always continue to be wild with their take (and attempts) on African American culture. Igwe 2Pac resurfaced this year—and reassured us that he's alive and well in Akukuland. See the first part of the 2012 film here, and peep a remix of his 'snitching' song featuring his friend, Snoopy Dogg.

President-Elect Nana Akufo-Addo and the Elves:

This came to be after Nana Akufo-Addo defeated incumbent John Mahama in Ghana's elections. Just watch.

Evil Kermit as an African Aunty:

Of course when pop culture icon, Kermit the Frog, goes viral, Africans put their own spin on it—featuring the nosey and pressure-building African aunty.

Ghanaian Gospel Music Video Parody:

Closing out this list is a meme video you may have missed. This is probably one of the most underrated memes of the year and it is too funny (and needs to be longer! We're looking at you, Ebabykobby!)

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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