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Beyoncé Channeled The Yoruba Deities Oshun And Yemoja For Her Pregnancy Shoot

Beyoncé referenced Yoruba goddesses Oshun and Yemoja in her recent maternity shoot.

I'm still not over Beyoncé's maternity photoshoot and I probably never will be, so deal.


The singer made waves earlier this week with the news of her pregnancy, and shared photos from her otherworldly maternity shoot, shot by Ethiopian conceptual artist Awol Erizku.

Many of the photos featured Bey as a Black Venus, donning long tresses and positioned gracefully before ornate floral backgrounds.

Some of the other images, showed the singer floating underwater while draped in bright yellow garments. Many have noticed that the images contain references to Oshun, the Yoruba orisha of love and fertility.

This isn't the first time that Beyoncé has referenced Yoruba spirituality in her work. Lemonade was packed with references to Afro-diasporic religion. The music video for "Hold Up" featured the singer in a flowing yellow gown reminiscent of the garments commonly associated with the deity. She also made references to the Igbo landing in the video for "Love Drought"

The Warsan Shire poem that Beyoncé posted on her website along with the photos also makes specific mention of both Oshun and the Yoruba water deity Yemoja.

With their striking visual beauty and underlying cultural significance, these photos have given me life all over again.

Check out more of the Yoruba-inspired photos below.





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Photo: Aisha Asamany

How Relocating to Ghana Helped Reinvigorate Jewelry Designer Aisha Asamany's Work

Moving to Ghana gave Aisha Asamany's luxury jewelry brand, inspired by Adinkra symbols that traditionally project strength, fearlessness, love and power, renewed verve to tell personal stories of her growing clientele.

In 2019, the government of Ghana made a global splash with its Year of Return initiative – the campaign sought to encourage the African diaspora to return home to the continent, specifically to Ghana.

Linked to the 400th year commemoration of the first recorded landing of slaves in the United States, it became a launchpad for the Ghanaian government to convince Black people around the world to permanently settle in the West African country.

Aisha Asamany, a corporate management consultant for high-profile UK financial institutions turned self-taught luxury jewelry designer was one of many who heeded the call, trading in the corporate life for a spiritual and an entrepreneurial journey – one of joy, appreciation, and representation in her fatherland.

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