News Brief

9 Times Bill O'Reilly Was A Racist Troll Who Absolutely Deserved What Was Coming To Him

Right-wing pundit and enemy of progress, Bill O'Reilly, was fired from his gig at Fox News earlier today, and a whopping zero people of color in the U.S. feel bad for him.


O'Reilly, who's been on the air waves for 21 years, was outed from the network following a plethora of sexual harassment allegations from former co-workers. He was the country's highest paid news host, and a central part of Fox News' success. So much so, that even with the surfacing of such accusations, the heads of Fox's decision-making body, were still hesitant to let him go—you know, because he's done so much good for American society and what not.

His platform has finally been taken away, but not before he was able to spew his racist blather to the masses. Here are some of the most offensive examples of his folly, which, of course, had to be culled from a very vast selection pool.

1. When he said that the #BlackLivesMatter movement was killing Americans.

2. When he made it very clear that he's among the willfully ignorant, who don't believe that racism is a part of American society.

3. This throwback clip of him exclaiming that "Africa is out of control, that whole continent is out of control."

4. The time he tried to tell Marc Lamont Hill that the NAACP was inherently unfair.

5. And that one time he told him that he looked like a cocaine dealer.

6. The time he hosted a debate on racism in America, without a single person of color present.

7. When he claimed that the African slaves who built the White House were "well-fed."

8. The Maxine Waters comment.

9. When he tried to defend the "white establishment" from so-called liberal media, because they're the real victims here.

Oh, and there's this quote too: "I've been to Africa three times. All right? You can't bring Western reasoning into the culture. The same way you can't bring it into fundamental Islam."

Bill O'Reilly is quite simply, trash, who's been begging for karma to haunt his life for many years now. It looks like it's finally arrived. And, like the strong black woman who he tried to come for once said, "it's all catching up with Bill O'Reilly...Bill O'Reilly needs to go to jail."

Preach Ms. Waters, preach.

 

Interview

A Candid Conversation With Olamide & Fireboy DML

We talk to the Nigerian stars about the hardest lessons they've learned, best advice they've ever been given and what Nigeria means to them.

Olamide and Fireboy DML have been working together for three years, but the first time they sit down to do an interview together is hours after they arrive in New York City on a promo tour.

It's Fireboy's first time in the Big Apple — and in the US — and the rain that's pouring outside his hotel doesn't hinder his gratitude. "It's such a relief to be here, it's long overdue," he tells OkayAfrica. "I was supposed to be here last year, but Covid stopped that. This is a time to reflect and refresh. It's a reset button for me."

Olamide looks on, smiling assuredly. Since signing Fireboy to his YBNL Nation label in 2018, he's watched the soulful young singer rise to become one of Nigeria's most talked-about artists — from his breakout single, "Jealous," to his debut album Laughter, Tears & Goosebumps, hit collabs with D.Smoke and Cuppy, and his sophomore release, Apollo, last year.

Even while he shares his own latest record, UY Scuti, with the world, Olamide nurtures Fireboy's career with as much care and attention as he does his own, oscillating between his two roles of artist and label exec seamlessly. His 2020 album Carpe Diem is the most streamed album ever by an African rap artist, according to Audiomack, hitting over 140 million streams. When Olamide signed a joint venture with US-based record label and distribution company, Empire, in February last year he did so through his label, bringing Fireboy and any other artist he decides to sign along for the ride, and establishing one of the most noteworthy deals on the continent.

Below, Olamide & Fireboy DML speak to OkayAfrica about their mutual admiration for each other, what makes them get up in the morning and how they switch off.

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