News

9 Times Bill O'Reilly Was A Racist Troll Who Absolutely Deserved What Was Coming To Him

Right-wing pundit and enemy of progress, Bill O'Reilly, was fired from his gig at Fox News earlier today, and a whopping zero people of color in the U.S. feel bad for him.


O'Reilly, who's been on the air waves for 21 years, was outed from the network following a plethora of sexual harassment allegations from former co-workers. He was the country's highest paid news host, and a central part of Fox News' success. So much so, that even with the surfacing of such accusations, the heads of Fox's decision-making body, were still hesitant to let him go—you know, because he's done so much good for American society and what not.

His platform has finally been taken away, but not before he was able to spew his racist blather to the masses. Here are some of the most offensive examples of his folly, which, of course, had to be culled from a very vast selection pool.

1. When he said that the #BlackLivesMatter movement was killing Americans.

2. When he made it very clear that he's among the willfully ignorant, who don't believe that racism is a part of American society.

3. This throwback clip of him exclaiming that "Africa is out of control, that whole continent is out of control."

4. The time he tried to tell Marc Lamont Hill that the NAACP was inherently unfair.

5. And that one time he told him that he looked like a cocaine dealer.

6. The time he hosted a debate on racism in America, without a single person of color present.

7. When he claimed that the African slaves who built the White House were "well-fed."

8. The Maxine Waters comment.

9. When he tried to defend the "white establishment" from so-called liberal media, because they're the real victims here.

Oh, and there's this quote too: "I've been to Africa three times. All right? You can't bring Western reasoning into the culture. The same way you can't bring it into fundamental Islam."

Bill O'Reilly is quite simply, trash, who's been begging for karma to haunt his life for many years now. It looks like it's finally arrived. And, like the strong black woman who he tried to come for once said, "it's all catching up with Bill O'Reilly...Bill O'Reilly needs to go to jail."

Preach Ms. Waters, preach.

 

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How Nigerian Streetwear Brand, Daltimore, is Rising To Celebrity Status

We spoke with founder and creative director David Omigie about expression through clothing and that #BBNaija pic.