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Black Lawmakers Wore Kente Cloth to the State of the Union to Protest Trump's 'Shithole' Remarks

Black representatives were not here for Trump's State of the Union address.

Donald Trump gave his first State of the Union Address last night, and while folks were criticizing the president all night on social media, the black lawmakers who were in attendance decided to take the shade to more symbolic levels.

While several members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), including Representative Maxine Waters, decided to skip the event, those who where in attendance collectively donned kente cloth—the recognizable patterned fabric which originated with the Ashanti people of Ghana—in order to protest Trump's infamous "shithole" comments and his overall affinity for anti-blackness.

"Wearing kente cloth to the #SOTU with my fellow @OfficialCBC Members to stand in solidarity with people from you-know-what countries," tweeted US Representative from Virgina Bobby Scott, just ahead of the address.

CBC members appeared conspicuously unenthused throughout the entire address, refusing to applaud when Trump tried to take credit for the decline in the African-American unemployment rate. Ha!

No one was having it. I mean, who does this man think he's fooling?

Congresswoman Alma S. Adams set the record straight about the black unemployment rate with a simple tweet.

"African American unemployment has been declining for a decade yet it's still double white unemployment," she wrote during the address. "Would POTUS be celebrating if this stat were the other way around?"

Great question Congresswoman. Shout out to the black lawmakers for continuing to call this man out on his "shithole-ness."

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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