News Brief

Black Women Are Keeping it Real on Twitter With These Hashtags Addressing Workplace Racism

Black women are taking to Twitter to tell their stories about dealing with racism at work.

Here is yet another example of why Black Twitter is a national treasure:


Bill O' Reilly was being his usual "ain't shit" self on Tuesday, during an episode of Fox & Friends, when he slighted Congresswoman Maxine Waters over a comment she made about the lack of true patriotism amongst Trump supporters. "I didn't hear a word she said. I was looking at her James Brown wig," he said in a failed attempt at humor.

His offensive comments, intended to discredit a highly accomplished black woman based on her appearance—as well as another incident in which White House Press Secretary Sean Spencer told April Ryan, the White House correspondent for American Urban Radio Networks, to "stop shaking her head" during a press conference—have sparked a conversation on social media about the racism that black women face in the workplace.

Several woman have taken to Twitter to share their experiences, using the hashtag #BlackWomenAtWork, and are helping create dialogue around the all too common issue.

 

Some of these are just TOO real.

Where are the lies? Oh yes, there are none, because this is what black women are forced to deal with daily.

 

Celebrities, and even Waters herself got in on the action.

#BlackWomenAtWork isn't the only viral conversation that's taking place around the matter. #StrongBlackWoman is an acknowledgement of our resilience. Being a #StrongBlackWoman doesn't mean we're superhuman or that we have a shield that protects us from constant demeaning. It doesn't help to limit our experiences to the single "strong" and "black" narrative,  but it certainly doesn't hurt to recognize our #BlackGirlMagic every now and again, especially when folks try to come for it.

 

News Brief
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Six Things History Will Remember Kenneth Kaunda For

News of Kenneth David Kaunda's passing, at age 97, has reverberated across the globe. Kaunda, affectionately known as KK, was Zambia's first President from 1964 to 1991.

Following Nelson Mandela's passing in December 2013, Kenneth Kaunda became Africa's last standing hero. Now with his passing on Thursday, June 17 — after being admitted to the Maina Soko Military Hospital in Lusaka earlier in the week — this signals the end of Africa's liberation history chapter.

It is tempting to make saints out of the departed. The former Zambian struggle hero did many great things. He was, after all, one of the giants of the continent's struggle against colonialism. Ultimately however, he was a human being. And as with all humans, he lived a complicated and colourful life.

Here are six facts you might not have known about him.

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