News Brief

#BlackSalonProblems is Trending & the Reactions are Too Real

Twitter turned into a support group of sorts this week with trending hashtag #BlackSalonProblems.

It’s been well established that hair with a natural curl pattern is mystifying, gravity-bending and, well, pretty damn awesome.


But those who haven’t been endowed with kinks and coils may not fully understand the struggle to maintain them (because it has a mind of its own and its mood depends on the day’s humidity levels), the cost and time involved, nor the patience required to keep it looking at peak fleekness whether worn in an afro, twists or braids, or laid for the gawds.

So Twitter turned into a support group of sorts this week with trending hashtag #BlackSalonProblems. And for those who have ridden on the struggle bus, the tweets and gif reactions are way too real.

Here are some of the best ones:

Yup, cause you already know when you set an appointment at the salon, especially if it’s on the weekend, you’re in it for the long haul.

So. Dead.

When you’ve been skipping regular trims because you’re too afraid the stylist is going to give you a big chop without your permission.

Getting your hair braided means you’re pretty much agreeing to forgo sleep and pop aspirin for at least a week.

Men who wear their hair cropped have no idea about the struggle.

Dear white people, I don’t think you fully understand the natural hair drama-trauma either.

When you get home and you realize that instead of your hair lookin’ on fleek, it’s so weak.

Cause black girls know that finding a decent stylist is like landing a dream job, and when you do, you wanna hold on for dear life.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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