Africa In Your Earbuds

AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #31: BODDHI SATVA

AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #31: Central African Republic-born DJ/producer BODDHI SATVA mixes African house music, centering on Angola.


Central African Republic-born DJ/producer, and Offering Recordings head, Boddhi Satva has been fermenting a signature sound he calls Ancestral Soul — a concoction of deep house infused with Central/West African rhythms and urban R&B, all shaped by mentors and collaborators such as Osunlade, Louie Vega and Alton Miller.

In Africa In Your Earbuds #31 he delivers an hour-long excursion into the many mutations of African house music, centering on Angola. As Boddhi Satva explains:

I have chosen to take the listener on a journey with various forms of Afro House by the likes of Atjazz, Rancido and Djeff from Angola. I first heard of him when I was mixing my album at Vega Records Studios, and Anané Vega played "Tambuleno" produced by Djeff & Silyvi. I had no idea Angola got down like that! I first went to there in 2010 and I was completely blown away. Angola is where it's at pretty much. Culturally, it has a growing impact on many other regions in Africa and throughout the world. I later met Djeff & Silyvi in Luanda and put out their track "Mwini" on my label Offering.

Stream/download AIYE #31: Boddhi Satva below! Big thanks to Underdog for the cover artwork.

TRACKLIST

01. Roland Brival - Sakitoya (Yoruba Soul Remix) (Martinique)

02. Zaki Ibrahim - Go Widdit (South Africa)

03. Alton Miller feat. Abacus - Ever Wonder (Unreleased Mix) (USA)

04. Rancido feat. Kholi - Easy (Deep Journey Main Mix) (Surinam & South Africa)

05. Kerri Chandler - Rain (Atjazz Remix) (USA & UK)

06. Robert Glasper feat. Meshell Ndegeocello - The Consequences of Jealousy (Boddhi Satva Ancestral Soul Remix) (USA & C.A.R)

07. Erin Leah - Radio Billy Stere Ella (N'Dinga Gaba Remix) (USA & C.A.R)

08. Siso K feat. Tumi - Lerato (Trinidadiandeep JuJu Remix) (South Africa & Trinidad)

09. Boddhi Satva feat. Oumou Sangaré - Ngnari Konon (Ancestral Soul Remix)

10. Dj Dorivaldo feat. Dr Tchubi & Péquente - Tchamayka (Original Mix) (Angola & DRC)

11. G'Sparks - Mukubwa(DRC)

12. Boddhi Satva feat. Mangala Camara - Nankoumandjan (Ancestral Dékalé Remix) (C.A.R & Mali)

13. Dj Djeff feat. Gari Sinedima - Piluka (Dub Mix)

Previously on Africa In Your Earbuds: L'AFRIQUE SOM SYSTEMENOMADIC WAXTHE BROTHER MOVES ONLVBEN ASSITER [JAMES BLAKE'S DRUMMER]JAKOBSNAKECHRISTIAN TIGER SCHOOLSAUL WILLIAMSTUNE-YARDSMATHIEU SCHREYERBLK JKSALEC LOMAMIDJ MOMAAWESOME TAPES FROM AFRICAPETITE NOIROLUGBENGARICH MEDINA, VOICES OF BLACK, LAMIN FOFANA, CHICO MANNDJ UNDERDOGDJ OBAHSABINEBROTHA ONACIDJ AQBTJUST A BANDSTIMULUSQOOL DJ MARVSINKANECHIEF BOIMA

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