News Brief

Watch Boddhi Satva's New Video For 'Muasi Na Ngai'

We premiere the Portugal-shot video for this new single featuring Badi and Kaysha.

Central African DJ and producer Boddhi Satva is known for his Afrohouse style of 'Ancestral Soul,' a blend of traditional rhythms with soul and electronic music.

The producer is back today with a new music video for "Muasi Na Ngai," which translates to 'my woman' in Lingala. The single sees him pairing up with Belgian rapper Badi and Congolese singer Kaysha, both acts that he's collaborated with before, for a song that blends French, English, and Lingala lyrics.

The new video, which we're premiering here today, was shot in Portugal and celebrates black beauty and womanhood.


"Muasi Na Ngai is an ode to women," writes Badi. "I feel like this song could be called Rumba-Trap for the rhythms (African, Brazilian and Urban) and the theme (love, loyalty, commitment). Everything about this collaboration is new and different for me. I believe that is what brings such magic, as we're stepping out of our respective comfort zones."

Boddhi Satva mentions, "I remember playing the demo of Muasi Na Ngai (My women) to Kaysha and Badi separately, and seeing exactly the same reaction on their faces. The melodies on the chorus came to Kaysha right away and the mix between his and Badi's vibe was just meant to be. Individually and collectively, our body of work has been consistent in always pushing further the boundaries of our own creativities. Muasi Na Ngai is, in my opinion, a good balance of different musical spices combined together to give birth to a very special song."

"We are installing a different sound and a different way of making African music," adds Kaysha. "We're not trying to mimic Americans but bringing a different, maybe more authentic approach."

Watch our premiere of "Muasi Na Ngai" below.

Boddhi Satva, Badi & Kaysha - Muasi Na Ngai (Official Video) youtu.be


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Boddhi Satva & James Germain's 'An Nou Ale' Is A Beautiful Pan-African Dance

Watch our premiere of the video for the Haitian and Senegal-influenced single "An Nou Ale."

Last December, Boddhi Satva took a trip to Port-Au-Prince, Haiti were he connected with some of the island's artists. One of those artists he worked with was singer James Germain, known as the creator of Kreol Mandingue.

The result of the artists' collaboration is "An Nou Ale" (Haitian creole for "Let's Go" or "Let's Go Together"), which sees the Central African Republic producer and Haitian singer link up with kora master N'Faly Kouyate.

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News Brief

Boddhi Satva & Badi's Video For 'Kitendi' Is A Black Vintage Fashion Dream

"The art direction and wardrobe give a hybrid mixture of styling eras with a forward-thinking approach," says Boddhi Satva.

Central African DJ and producer Boddhi Satva is sharing the new video for “Kitendi,” featuring Congolese-Belgian rapper Badi—a track that sees the MC flex over paralyzing kicks and bass lines.

The video, which we are premiering here today, was art directed by London-based dandies Sam Lambert and Shaka Maidoh of ACF with vintage styling by Amah Ayivi. 

It showcases the lovely people at Café Barge in Paris with flashes of of legendary African musicians such as Stervos Niarcos, Papa Wemba and Kester Emeneya who pioneered “La SAPE,” a fashion movement in the 60s.

“‘Kitendi,’” says Boddhi Satva, “took Badi and I out of our musical comfort zone. The art direction by Art Comes First and wardrobe by Marché Noir give a hybrid mixture of styling eras with a forward-thinking approach. Most importantly, this project is a 100% Pan African effort.”

Watch the Gilles Geek-directed video for “Kitendi” above.

 

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Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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