Audio
Bombino. Photo: Richard Dumas / Partisan Records.

Bombino "Gets Closer to Africa" In His New Tuareg Blues Album 'Deran'

Tuareg legend Omara "Bombino" Moctar returned to Northern Africa to record his fifth proper album.

The exciting new full-length from Bombino serves as a career retrospective of sorts, touching on the different styles and various iterations of this renowned musician born in Niger. On Deran, the desert blues, traditional folk, and "Tuareggae" music styles Bombino has experimented with over the last decade come together in an amalgam of perfect unity.

Since his collaboration with The Black Keys' Dan Auerbach and subsequent signing to Nonesuch, Bombino has been lauded as one of the world's greatest living blues guitarists. Producers like Auerbach and, most recently, Dirty Projectors' Dave Longstreth have collaborated with Bombino in an attempt to capture the raging spectacle of his live show. Most often they came up short. But despite what those American recording studios couldn't reproduce, they excelled in inspiring Bombino to realize the limitless possibilities of his music.


For Deran, Bombino and his band of Tuareg musicians returned to Africa to record at Casablanca's Studio HIBA. Save for the 2014 Glitterbeat album Agamgam 2004, recorded live in the south central Saharan desert Ténéré, this was his first time recording an album in his homeland continent.

"My mission for this album was always to get closer to Africa," he tells his label Partisan Records.

The Moroccan studio space afforded Bombino the time, space and comfort necessary to create an album that truly taps into to the Tuareg region he hails from. "An important thing to know is the desert is a very vast open space," Bombino told The New York Times. "Sound and music there carries a power with it, so you get the feeling when you're holding an instrument in your hand and playing it, you're completing a picture that was otherwise incomplete."

A similar, in-house ethos was considered for collaborators on Deran. The record was produced by Bombino's manager Eric Herman, which is to say the record was hardly produced at all (no shade intended). The executive decision to choose his manager to produce an LP was a brilliant one. Complete independence and total creative agency were things rarely granted to Bombino in the studio. But on these new songs that's exactly the kind of freedom he has.

Bombino makes a conscious effort to strip down some of the bells and whistles Longstreth used to make his last record, Azel. He applies everything he's learned and experienced with an air of sophistication and a certain amount of physical restraint, working against the Jimi Hendrix comparison critics have historically gravitated toward.

For all intent and purposes, it feels as if Bombino's desert has been brought to the studio. The album's closing tracks "Takamba" and "Adouagh Chegren" sound as if they've been recorded live and work well to replicate the sensation of vastness and openness felt during Bombino's famous outdoor concerts in Niger and Algeria.

Bombino's best work might still be ahead of him, but Deran will stand through time as the first record to adequately voice his artistry.

Bombino's 'Deran' is available now from Partisan Records.


News
Image via TONL.

Uganda Has Lost Millions of Internet Users as a Result of Its Controversial Social Media Tax

The infamous tax is effectually driving Ugandans off the internet.

The number of internet users in Uganda has declined significantly since the implementation of the highly-criticized tax on social media, which went into effect in July of last year.

While the government claimed that the tax would assist in raising government revenue and help "maintain the security of the country and extend electricity so that you people can enjoy more of social media, more often, more frequently," said Uganda's Finance Minister Matia Kasaija at the time. President Museveni also suggested that the tax would help "curb gossip" online.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Cover art for Riky Rick's "You and I"

The 14 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Riky Rick, Mr Eazi, Moonchild Sanelly, Burna Boy, Blinky Bill, Niniola and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow OkayAfrica on Spotify and Apple Music to get immediate updates every week and read about some of our selections ahead.

Keep reading... Show less
Literature
Image courtesy of Doubleday.

Oyinkan Braithwaite's 'My Sister the Serial Killer' Is the Lagos-Set Novel Rocking the Crime Thriller Genre

We speak with the Nigerian author about the success of her debut novel, and breaking the boundaries of "African Lit."

"I have always been drawn to dark topics," says Oyinkan Braithwaite, the 30-year-old Nigerian author behind the critical darling of a novel My Sister, the Serial Killer.

Her declaration helps explain the subject and title of her debut novel, which tells the story of Ayoola, a young woman who has developed a not-so-healthy habit of murdering her boyfriends, leaving her older sister, the book's protagonist, Korede to clean up her mess. You may have noticed it's ubiquitous cover—which features a young black woman wearing a headwrap, casually looking on as a knife-wielding hands is reflected in her sunglasses—on your timeline or at your local store. The internationally-released, Nigerian-made novel sits confidently on retail shelves previously reserved for mass-market thrillers.

The dark and humorous, Lagos-set novel is extreme—but not just because of all the murdering that happens. It also examines the extreme nature of the many things that can push people to the edge. For the sisters, it's: intergenerational trauma, abuse, the prevalence of a culture that rewards beauty above all else, as well as having to battle with their own personal shortcomings—just to name a few.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.