Arts + Culture

The Anti-World Cup Graffiti Popping Up On Brazilian Streets Pt. 2

A gallery of murals by street artists in protest of the Brazil 2014 World Cup

As Brazil scrambles to ready infrastructure on the the eve of the 2014 World Cup, the host nation's embattled president Dilma Roussef believes that her country is fully prepared to host football's largest tournament despite all evidence to the contrary. With daily strike threats from transportation union leaders and reports that construction workers are still installing seating inside São Paulo's Corinthians Arena, where the opening match between the host nation and Croatia is set to take place, it comes as no surprise that 61% of Brazil's population is staunchly anti-World Cup. We covered these popular feelings a few weeks ago with the first installment of our anti-World Cup graffiti gallery, and now, more street murals that capture the frustrations of millions of Brazilians have surfaced online. Click through the gallery above to view more of the anti-FIFA graffiti popping up ahead of Brazil 2014.

Interview

Interview: The Awakening of Bas

We talk to Bas about The Messenger, Bobi Wine, Sudan, and the globalized body of Black pain.

The first thing you notice when you begin to listen to The Messenger—the new investigative documentary podcast following the rise of Ugandan singer, businessman and revolutionary political figure Bobi Wine—is Bas' rich, paced, and deeply-affecting storytelling voice.

Whether he is talking about Uganda's political landscape, painting a picture of Bobi Wine's childhood, or drawing parallels between the violence Black bodies face in America and the structural oppression Africans on the continent continue to endure at the hands of corrupt government administrations, there is no doubt that Bas (real name Abbas Hamad) has an intimate understanding of what he's talking about.

We speak via Zoom, myself in Lagos, and him in his home studio in Los Angeles where he spends most of his time writing as he cools off from recording the last episode of The Messenger. It's evident that the subject matter means a great deal to the 33-year-old Sudanese-American rapper, both as a Black man living in America and one with an African heritage he continues to maintain deep ties with. The conversation around Black bodies enduring various levels of violence is too urgent and present to ignore and this is why The Messenger is a timely and necessary cultural work.

Below, we talk with Bas aboutThe Messenger podcast, Black activism, growing up with parents who helped shape his political consciousness and the globalized body of Black pain.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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