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British-Nigerian Actor David Ajala Will be Joining 'Star Trek: Discovery'

David Ajala will join the cast in the third season as a regular of the Sci-Fi series.

This past weekend, at the San Diego Comic-Con 2019, the Star Trek Universe panel announced that British-Nigerian actor, David Ajala would be joining the cast as a season regular in the third season of the Sci-Fi series. The third season of the series will pick up where the season two left off but will be 1000 years into the future and follow the USS Discovery as it explores new worlds and discovers new civilizations.


Ajala, who is no stranger to the supernatural genre, is best known for his lead role in the supernatural thriller series, Falling Water, which was on air for two seasons as well as his role in the Nightflyers series, which ran for a single season. Ajala has also starred in Supergirl.

In Star Trek: Discovery, Ajala will be playing the character of Cleveland "Book" Booker who has been described as a naturally charismatic fellow whose carefree attitude often leads him into as much trouble as it gets him out of it.

Co-creator of the series, Alex Kurtzman, described what fans can expect of the third season saying, "Obviously we made a pretty radical jump into the future at the end of season two—we're going almost a 1000 years into the future in season three, which is crazy. Further than any Trek series has ever gone before." He also added, "So there will be lots and lots of huge changes in season three. There will be things you recognize, there will be things you don't recognize."

Watch the trailer for season three of Star Trek: Discoveryhere.


Africa In Your Earbuds
Photo by: Kin Kwesy

Mr Eazi Releases 'Patek' With DJ Tárico & Joey B

Mr Eazi has returned with an Amapiano anthem.


Oluwatosin Ajibade, better known as Mr Eazi recently joined forces with Mozambique's Dj Tárico and Ghana's Joey B to release "Patek." The track marks the singer's first time testing on South Africa's buzzing Amapiano sound, which has now become a global phenomenon.

Mr Eazi spontaneously recorded an early version of the song in South Africa earlier this year. An earlier-released snippet of the song also inspired a lot of TikTok background soundtracks and that pushed the singer to complete the song. The Nigerian artist has been the mastermind behind hit songs like “Pour Me Water,” “Skin Tight” and “Leg Over.” He has also worked with global superstars like Beyoncé, Bad Bunny and J Balvin. He is also the pioneer behind of Banku music, a sound that merges Ghanaian highlife music and Nigerian chord progressions.

"Patek" is a breezy and dreamy tune that is primarily carried by Mr Eazi and Joey B’s vocals while DJ Tárico’s tune highlights the amapiano sound. In discussing the record, Mr. Eazi describes the song as a fun track that merges different parts of culture and sound.

“It’s really not that deep,” said Mr Eazi. “It’s a fun song that I can’t wait to perform. And it’s got Nigeria, Ghana and Mozambique all together on one track.”

“Patek” comes on the heels of the singer's recent 2022 releases “Legalize and“Personal Baby,” as the singer gears up to release his 2023 album, he is expected to roll out more singles in the coming months.

In addition to making music, Mr Eazi founded emPawa Africa, a talent incubator program that creates opportunities for African artists, and was featured on CNN,Rolling Stone,Billboard andForbes for its strategy in expanding African music globally. Mr Eazi has garnered over 3 billion streams, making him one of Africa's most streamed artists. Watch the visualizer to "Patek" below.

Popular
Photo: Cyrille Choupas

Alice Diop On Using Film to Center Marginalized Stories

The French director, whose latest film Saint Omer has been selected by France as its submission for the Best International Picture race, is known for her nuanced portraits of humanity.

“When I hear myself through Nicholas, I find me [sic] too radical!” French filmmaker Alice Diop jokes during our conversation, after hearing some of her words and thoughts filtered through her translator Nicholas Elliott.

Diop was responding passionately to a question about the tensions in France between holding onto assimilation policies and embracing a more modern ethos of inclusion and diversity. She is tying her argument to the radical leaning of French republicanism, which is very, very different from the conservative spirit embraced by the Republican party in the United States, where she is expected to appear in October to present her latest film, Saint Omer at the New York Film Festival.

Saint Omer marks Diop’s transition to fiction after seventeen years working as a documentary filmmaker. The film, which won the Grand Jury prize and best debut feature prizes recently at the Venice Film Festival where it debuted, is a wrenching legal drama that follows a young novelist Rama (Kayije Kagame) covering the trial of an immigrant mother accused of infanticide.

Before her triumph at Venice, Diop was in New York to promote the MUBI release of her latest documentary, We (Nous), which premiered at the 2021 Berlinale, where it won the Encounters Grand Prize. The film chronicles a disparate group of people, including an immigrant mechanic and a writer from the Parisian suburbs, and places their lives in connection to the RER B commuter train cutting through the city from the north to south. Diop makes We (Nous) a personal declaration of belonging, weaving footage from her family archive and trailing her sister, a home nurse, at work as she provides care for her patients.

Diop, who is a first-generation daughter of immigrants from Senegal had a wide-ranging chat with OkayAfrica about her films, belonging to French society, and her reasons for prioritizing the stories of the marginalized.

Interview has been edited for length and clarity.

In We (Nous), you are telling these seemingly unrelated stories without obvious connections. What is the common thread linking these stories or people together?

The link is a very personal vision that I have of French society. It is a vision that is at once a dreamed vision but also something already there and not many people see. It is about what can unite people who appear to be so different in a single territory or country. And in a sense, the thread is one that I am weaving myself. It doesn’t exist as such but something very subjective.

In terms of constructing the film, what was the starting point for you?

It started from the book, The Passengers of the Roissy Express published in France about 30 years ago. It is a nonfiction book in which the writer, François Maspero takes the RER B train and follows it to the last stop. This is the train that has the peculiarity of crossing all of the Paris banlieues (low-income suburbs) from north to south. Now these are very different areas that have a great diversity of populations that really express the complexity of French society. I read this book, and it gave me the framework for using the name of the train to describe these very different territories.

A still from the film, We (Nous) of train tracks.

We (Nous) chronicles a disparate group of people, including an immigrant mechanic and a writer from the Parisian suburbs, and places their lives in connection to the RER B commuter train cutting through the city from the north to south.

Photo: Mubi

At what point does your family come in and how do you weave them into the narrative?

This film is a composition of the singularities of the many different people who live and work in France, and my family is part of that history. That is why I wanted to use our family archive in the film because it is a symbolic way of inscribing these traces of my family, and people like them, who are not shown in the constitution of French society. The archive, for me, completes a missing part of French history. I have so little in terms of archives of my family. I have only less than 17 minutes of images of my mother and everything that I have is in this film. That is something very painful; the lives that my parents had were not necessarily appreciated. These were lives that were not epic or did not have the right narratives. At least that was the feeling that I had because the people that I saw on television, in films and novels were not like me. They did not have my history or background, so I grew up with that absence. And I think that is why I became a filmmaker, to repair the violence of having this unrepresented life.

In a sense, this film, and your entire career has been about adjusting this narrative?

Absolutely. This question touches me because this is at the very heart of my filmmaking. I have done this work ever since the desire came upon me to do it, as a way to not succumb to the anger. My new (fiction) film, Saint Omer is focused on Black women, and is inspired by my mother, and it made me realize how much I needed to do this. I want to add up their bodies in film and in history.

Film, for me, is not a space for entertainment, it is a space for revenge and self-care. Saint Omer is not about the banlieues at all. I believe that people from the banlieues have every right to make films that are not about the banlieues. It is about maternity, and I have every right to talk about maternity because it is a question that is relevant to Black women, as much as it is to white women. I am speaking from my own body, and I think the closer I am to myself, the more likely I am to touch other people.

In the film, you talk about not paying into the family fund that ensures you are buried back home in Senegal. Was coming to this realization difficult?

Exile is not just measured in economic gain; it is also a loss that I cannot even qualify. This relationship to the land where you will be buried, I find it a beautiful thing to choose where you are going to die. But the most concrete way of saying where you belong is to say where you are going to be buried. And for me to say it publicly the way I did was for me to cut myself off. I have a 13-year-old mixed race son who was born and lives in France. I speak French, I don’t speak Wolof. I go to Senegal twice a year at most. I am a Frenchwoman.

Now, I am a very particular kind of Frenchwoman; I am a Black woman with colonial history so the most concrete way for me to be French is to say I am going to be buried where my son lives, or where he is most probably going to live. And that’s not a choice between France and Senegal that I am making, it is a way of saying that I am in harmony with where I am. But it does separate me forever from the place where my parents came from. It is hard to think about, even in this conversation with you. It is the entire complexity that is raised here: of the path of immigrants, of the trajectories of coming and of going, of where you are. It is something that is so complex and intense that merely signifying it is already an achievement. It is also a very universal question.

A still from the film We (Nous) of the filmmaker sitting at a table with an interviewee.

Alice Diop and Pierre Bergounioux in a pivotal moment from We (Nous).

Photo: Mubi

And when you put yourself in the frame by the end of the film, are you completing this tapestry that you are sewing?

In a sense. My appearing with my Black woman’s body in the frame, next to this writer Pierre Bergounioux, in his office is a way for me to get revenge for my father for the 40 difficult years he spent working in France. There is a point in the film when I ask my father if spending these years in France has been positive or negative, and he says it’s been a positive gain overall. But I have the intuition that for his daughter to be able to go to university and do things that as a working man, and my mother as a cleaning woman, never had the opportunity to do, and then to show myself in the frame next to this white writer in the film that I am making -- that I have invited the writer to -- I think that shows something about French society and what it can allow. And that repairs, to some degree, the pain that my parents experienced by coming here to offer me a life that they could not have.

Translation by Nicholas Elliott.

Music
(Photo: Grammys)

The Grammys Are Considering An Afrobeats Category

The Recording Academy's CEO recently mentioned talk of adding an Afrobeats category to its line-up of awards.


In a recent trip to Ghana, Recording Academy CEO Harvey Mason Jr. told Ghanaian journalists that the Recording Academy was in talks with the key players in the Afrobeats music scene to explore the possibility of adding Afrobeats to the award's genre list. During the conversation, he mentioned that the Academy was working with "leaders of the Afrobeats community" to promote inclusivity at the Grammys.

“We just had a meeting literarily about six to seven days ago, with leaders of the Afrobeats community… We had listening session where we heard from Afrobeats creators, we talked about the different subgenres what are the needs, what are the desires, and my goal is to represent all genres of music including Afrobeats at the Grammys," said Mason.

Although Mason said that the process was ongoing, the right strategy would have to be taken to ensure that things go off without a hitch.

"I don’t decide categories. The categories are decided by proposals by members. Members can say ‘Harvey, I want an Afrobeat category,’ they write a proposal for the category they talked about. So that process is started now. We did a listening session last week for the step towards that path,” said Mason.

Afrobeats has become a global phenomenon, and has taken a spot on the world stage as one of the leading genres in music. Artists like Burna Boy, Davido, Wizkid and a bevy of others have pushed the sound of Africa past the shores of Africa, and have gotten the respect, attention and admiration of music lovers worldwide.

If Afrobeats becomes a category at the Grammys, it will further push the sounds of West Africa to the fore front and will also give subgenres like Amapiano, which is quickly becoming a rave in the Africa music scene extra visibility.When Mason's comments hit the internet, there was a mix of reactions. Although some music consumers viewed the news as a good development for the African continent, others had a more cynical point of view about it. In the past, the Recording Academy has been on the receiving end of backlash about its lack of diversity and conformity with global African music, and some of those concerns have resurfaced.

See some reactions below

Music
(YouTube)

The 9 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Sarkodie, Mr Eazi, King Promise, Tiwa Savage, Major League DJz, and more.

Every week, we highlight the top releases through our best music of the week column, Songs You Need to Hear. Here's our round-up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks.

If you like these music lists, you can also check out our Best Songs of the Month columns following Nigerian, Ghanaian, East African and South African music.

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