Audio

AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #28: THE BROTHER MOVES ON

For Africa In Your Earbuds #28 The Brother Moves On mix Tumi and The Volume, Animal Collective, Just A Band, Gil Scott-Heron, Kay Ara + more.


Jo'burg based The Brother Moves On aren't easy to condense. The self-described "collaborative piece of performance art in the form of a band," often labeled by SA writers as 'afro space folk funk,' live in a highly-hybrid realm, compounding a vast number of genres and ideas in search of a sound with which to describe post-apartheid South Africa.

For this installment Africa In Your Earbuds The Brother Moves On offer a dense mix featuring tracks/reworkings from an ecletic cast: Tumi and The Volume, Animal Collective, Just A Band, Gil Scott-Heron and Kay Ara and an introduction that pairs audio from Neil Armstrong's moon landing with H.F. Verwoed speaking on apartheid.

Stream and download AIYE #28: The Brother Moves On "The Mothership" below! Shout out to Underdog for the cover artwork.

TRACKLIST

Intro. Neil Armstrong Landing on The Moon / H.F Verwoed Explains apartheid / Sikelela – The Brother Moves On (TBMO)

1. Kay Ara – Me Dough ft Lil Shaker and Yaa Pono

2. Afrique - Tumi and the Volume (TATV)

3. Quick as White – Animal Collective vs Kasai Allstars

4. C U L8r – TBMO remix of Motel Mari’s See You Later.

5. We babe mncane – Busi Mhlongo

6. Tingiza Kichiwa – Just A Band

7. Liberie – Neo Muyanga

8. Ba dutse – Neo Muyanga

9. You too Brutus? – Bateleur

10. Do do wap is strong in here – Curtis Mayfield

11. Mmalo We – Bayete

12. Undaunted spirit – Feya Faku

13. Mo Bophelong - Kwani Experience

14. Love and Peace – Quincy Jones

15. Whitey on the Moon – Gil Scott Heron

Previously on Africa In Your Earbuds: LV, BEN ASSITER [JAMES BLAKE'S DRUMMER]JAKOBSNAKE, CHRISTIAN TIGER SCHOOLSAUL WILLIAMSTUNE-YARDSMATHIEU SCHREYERBLK JKSALEC LOMAMIDJ MOMAAWESOME TAPES FROM AFRICAPETITE NOIROLUGBENGA, RICH MEDINA, VOICES OF BLACK, LAMIN FOFANA, CHICO MANNDJ UNDERDOGDJ OBAHSABINEBROTHA ONACIDJ AQBTJUST A BANDSTIMULUSQOOL DJ MARVSINKANECHIEF BOIMA

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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