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Buraka Som Sistema's Boiler Room x RBMA Takeover In Lisbon

Watch the full 40-minute Buraka Som Sistema's Red Bull Music Academy Boiler room set from Lisbon.


Lisbon global bass crew Buraka Som Sistema played a booming hometown show this past January as part of a collaboration between Red Bull Music Academy and Boiler Room. Nearing forty minutes, the live streamed concert (Buraka's third with Boiler Room) saw the electronic dance collective performing their recent singles, like the pounding "STOOPID" off their latest Buraka LP. Behind Buraka producer Branko's manual mastery, the set also boasts mashes and medleys of tracks from their deep catalog. The monstrous "Sente," for example, melds with the hurdling "Hangover" from the band's 2011 Komba LP for the explosive "Sente + Hangover." And Komba's drum-floored title track mixes with "Van Damme," a skippy song off Buraka, to form the slow-fast combo of "Komba + Van Damme." Watch Buraka Som Sistema's Red Bull Music Academy Boiler Room set from Lisbon, packed with agile dancing and and high-octane stage maneuvers, below. You can read an interview with Branko that was done before the concert over here. If you’re in NYC, catch Branko at our upcoming Okayafrica Electrafrique party March 4 in Brooklyn (FREE with RSVP).

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Photo by Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

How Davido's 'FEM' Became the Unlikely #EndSARS Protest Anthem

When Nigerian youth shout the line "Why everybody come dey para, para, para, para for me" at protests, it is an act of collective rebellion and rage, giving flight to our anger against the police officers that profile young people, the bureaucracy that enables them, and a government that appears lethargic.

Some songs demand widespread attention from the first moments they unfurl themselves on the world. Such music are the type to jerk at people's reserves, wearing down defenses with an omnipresent footprint at all the places where music can be shared and enjoyed, in private or in communion; doubly so in the middle of an uncommonly hot year and the forced distancing of an aggressive pandemic that has altered the dynamics of living itself. Davido's "FEM" has never pretended to not be this sort of song. From the first day of its release, it has reveled in its existence as the type of music to escape to when the overbearing isolation of lockdown presses too heavily. An exorcism of ennui, a sing-along, or a party starter, "FEM" was made to fit whatever you wanted it to be.

However, in the weeks since its release, the song has come to serve another purpose altogether. As young Nigerians have poured out into the streets across the country to protest against the brutality of the Federal Special Anti-Robbery Squad, known as SARS, "FEM" has kept playing with the vigour of a generational protest anthem. From Lagos to Abia to Benin and Abuja, video clips have flooded the Internet of people singing word-for-word to Davido's summer jam as they engage in peaceful protests. In one video, recorded at Alausa, outside the Lagos State Government House, youths break into an impromptu rendition of the song when the governor of the state, Babajide Sanwo-Olu, tried addressing them; chants of "O boy you don dey talk too much" rent through the air, serving as proof of their dissatisfaction with his response to their demands—and the extortionist status quo.

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Trump to Remove Sudan from Terrorist List Following 330 Million Dollar Payment

President Donald Trump has announced that Sudan will be removed from the list of countries that allegedly sponsor terrorism after Sudan recently met the required payment of USD 330 million.