Popular

Caster Semenya Is Taking Legal Action Against the IAAF's Discriminatory Testosterone Rule

"I am Mokgadi Caster Semenya. I am a woman and I am fast."

Back in April, the IAAF announced its plans to establish new eligibility requirements for "female classification," which means that female runners who naturally possess higher levels of testosterone will have to compete in other races or race against men.

The policy goes into effect on November 1, and applies to women who participate in the 400m to the mile, including hurdles, 400m, 800m and 1500m races.

The rule unfairly targets runners like the 27-year-old South African track star Caster Semenya and she plans to fight back.

"It is not fair. I just want to run naturally, the way I was born," said the two-time Olympic champion. "I am Mokgadi Caster Semenya. I am a woman and I am fast."

She will fight the ruling at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas), reports BBC Sport. Her case is set to take place today in Lausanne.

"Ms. Semenya, like all athletes, is entitled to compete the way she was born without being obliged to alter her body by any medical means," said the athlete's lawyers. Semenya says that the ruling further stigmatizes women who do not conform to contrived notions of femininity, and may cause some to take unsafe measure to alter their bodies as a result.

This is not the first time Semenya has been targeted on account of gender classification. She has been asked by athletics officials in the past to take tests in order to identify her gender.

"I am very upset that I have been pushed into the public spotlight again," Semenya said in her first extensive remarks about the rule since it was announced in April.

"I don't like talking about this new rule," she was quoted as saying in The New York Times. "I just want to run naturally, the way I was born. It is not fair that I am told I must change. It is not fair that people question who I am."

Interview
Photo by Toka Hlongwane.

Toka Hlongwane’s Photo Series ‘Impilo ka Darkie’ Aims to Give an Insight Into Black South Africans’ Experiences

With his latest photo series, 'Impilo ka Darkie', South African photographer Toka Hlongwane offers an imperfect but compelling insight into the lives of the people he has encountered through his travels.

Toka Hlongwane is a Johannesburg-based documentary photographer whose work often casts a lens on society's underclass. His most recent photo series, Impilo ka Darkie, shot over five years, is Hlongwane's attempt to answer two questions: what does it mean to be Black? And, above that, what is the measure of Black life?

Part of Impilo ka Darkie's appeal is that it also documents Hlongwane's growth as a photographer. As the years roll on, his composition becomes stronger, the focus on his pictures becomes much sharper and a storyline begins to emerge in his work.

Keep reading... Show less
News Brief
Still taken from 'Nkulunkulu' music video.

Kamo Mphela's Latest EP 'Nkulunkulu' is a Must-Listen

While Kamo Mphela's comparison to the late Lebo Mathosa has been front and centre, it's really her vibrant amapiano EP 'Nkulunkulu' that should be centre stage.

South African amapiano artist, Kamo Mphela, has been a major talking point on social media recently after one fan on social media compared her to the late kwaito artist, Lebo Mathosa. While the debate focused on whether the comparison had any merit to it (as is often the case in comparisons between new wave and veteran artists), what is undeniable is the talent of both women. Twenty-one-year-old Mphela, who released her Nkulunkulu EP last week, delivered a vibrant project which deserves to be acknowledged beyond conversations that unwittingly take away from her own journey as an upcoming artist.

Keep reading... Show less
Photo by Alfredo Zuniga / AFP

Mozambique's Political Unrest: Where Things Stand

Fears continue to be on the rise as more attacks by militants are anticipated in Mozambique's Cabo Delgado province.

On March 24th, militants stormed Palma—a gas-rich city in Mozambique—as part of an ongoing insurgency in the country dating back to 2017. Dozens of civilians have been killed although an official death toll has not been declared as of yet. Currently, at least 8000 more have been left displaced, fleeing to other parts of the country and attempting to seek asylum in Tanzania. This is believed to be the worst attacks carried out by the Islamist militant group, Al-Shabaab, to date.
Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Former Burkinabe President Charged with Thomas Sankara's Murder

Justice is on the horizon as Burkina Faso's former president, Blaise Compaore, is indicted for the 1987 assassination of Thomas Sankara.