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DOHA, QATAR - MAY 03: Caster Semenya of South Africa looks on prior to competing in the Women's 800 metres during the IAAF Diamond League event at the Khalifa International Stadium on May 03, 2019 in Doha, Qatar. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

Caster Semenya to Appeal Discriminatory Testosterone Ruling At Swiss Supreme Court

The star athlete will ask the court to "set aside the decision of Cas in its entirety."

Caster Semenya isn't backing down.

After the Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas) rejected her challenge of its controversial testosterone rules earlier this month—which will force women with naturally higher levels of testosterone to either take medication or compete in different races—the Olympic gold medalist, has now filed an appeal in the Swiss Supreme Court, BBC Sport reports.

Semenya will urge to court to "set aside the decision of the Cas in its entirety," according to a statement. The athlete referred to the case as a matter of protecting "fundamental human rights."

"I am a woman and world-class athlete," said 28-year-old Semenya. "The IAAF will not drug me or stop me from being who I am."


Semenya lost the landmark case against the testosterone rule earlier this month, when Cas determined that the decision was "necessary, reasonable and proportionate" to protect "the integrity of female athletics."

Several online rallied behind the athlete following the ruling, using the hashtag #JustDoItForCaster. Many supporters spoke out against it, calling it discriminatory and yet another case of the accomplished South African Athlete being targeted by sports institutions, as she has been throughout her decade-long career.

The athlete echoed this sentiment in early May when Cas' decision to reject her challenge was announced. "For a decade the IAAF has tried to slow me down, but this has actually made me stronger. The decision of Cas will not hold me back," she said. "I will once again rise above and continue to inspire young women and athletes in South Africa and around the world."

"The IAAF regulations violate the most fundamental principles of Swiss public policy," said lawyer Dorothee Schramm who will be leading Semenya's appeal. "In the race for justice, human rights must win over sporting interests."

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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