News Brief

Caster Semenya Wins Gold in Historic Women's 800m Victory for South Africa

Middle-distance runner Caster Semenya is the first black South African woman to win gold at the Olympics.

The world is having an hour. Frank Ocean just broke the internet with the release of his second surprise album in two days, the highly, highly-anticipated and very much long-awaited Boys Don’t Cry Blond LP.


And we love you, Frank. But let’s be real. Tonight belongs to someone else.

Caster Semenya is officially an Olympic champion.

The South African middle-distance star from Polokwane made history mere moments ago in Rio, emerging victorious in the final of the women’s 800-metre event with a time of 1:55.28. Burundi’s Francine Niyonsaba and Kenya’s Margaret Wambui put up a good fight. Semenya, calm and collected as always, pulled away in the final 200 metres.

She didn’t break Czech runner Jarmilla Kratochvilova’s 33-year-old world record of 1:53:28 as many were hoping. But she did set a new national record in South Africa and make history as the first black South African woman to win gold at the Olympics.

Semenya’s win brings South Africa’s medal count to their goal of ten. It was their second gold of the 2016 Summer Games––on Sunday, sprinter Wayde van Niekerk put on one of the great Olympic performances of all time and smashed American track-and-field star Michael Johnson’s 17-year world record.

Niyonsaba's second-place finish (with a time of 1:56.49) marks Burundi's first medal of the Rio Games. Wambui's third-place finish (1:56.89) brings Kenya's medal count to eleven.

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Karim Jaafar/Getty Images

Caster Semenya has Penned a Powerful Story About her Athletic Career

In 'I Wanted to be a Soldier', the two-time Olympic gold medalist finally speaks out about the injustices she's faced.

South African athlete Caster Semenya has said very little about her battle with the IAAF and the testosterone regulations they've imposed on her. Aside from the statements issued by her lawyers as they appealed the decision made by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas) at the Swiss Federal Court, Semenya has remained relatively silent on the matter and provided very little comment in her personal capacity. That is until now. She recently penned a story entitled I Wanted to be a Soldier for The Players' Tribune where she talks about her love for athletics as a child and the challenges and humiliation she's had to face over the years.

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Photo: Kate Green via OISPhotos.

Ayomide Bello Is the First Nigerian Woman Canoeist to Qualify for the Olympics

The young athlete is headed for Olympic gold at the 2020 games in Tokyo.

Nigerian woman are making their mark across all areas of sport, and now for the first time ever the country will be sending its first ever woman canoeist to the Olympics.

At just 17, Ayomide Bello will become the first female Nigerian canoeist to compete at the Olympic games when they head to Tokyo in 2020. The teenager beat out other African contenders at the C1 200 event at Africa's Tokyo 2020 qualifiers in Morocco last week to claim the spot, according to BBC Sport.

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Image courtesy of La Sunday.

Photos: How La Sunday Became Abidjan's Favorite Party

Faced with a lack of party options, a group of friends in Côte d'Ivoire sought to revolutionize the way their city turns up.

The opening line of DJ Arafat's hit song "Maman Sery" plays and the people on stage scream it as loudly as the crowd facing them below. Lighted phones are up in the air. Where some strangers embrace one another, others clutch their chests. The setting? A garden in Abidjan's commune of Cocody on a Sunday night.

Sundays in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire had always been reserved for beach trips and family time. All of this changed dramatically in December of 2018 when Fayçal Lazraq, Lionel Obam, Aurore Aoussi, Charles Tanoh-Boutchoue, and Aziz Doumbia, better known as Bain de Foule Creative Studio created La Sunday and it took Abidan by storm.

According to Charles Tanoh-Boutchoue, co-founder of La Sunday, "The idea was to create an alternative event for fun amongst friends." The differentiating factor here was these "friends" weren't just anyone; they were trendsetters at the epicenter of Abidjan's bustling creative scene. Shares from these creatives were instrumental in creating the engagement surrounding La Sunday and its subsequent expansion.

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Still from Burna Boy's Tiny Desk concert video via NPR.

Watch Burna Boy's Mellowed-Out 'Tiny Desk' Concert

Watch the 'African Giant' run through some of his hits like 'Gbona,' 'Ye' and more for NPR's Tiny Desk concert series.

Burna Boy is the latest artist to grace NPR's famous Tiny Desk.

The Nigerian "afrofusion" star took to the set for a mellowed out performance of four of his biggest tracks. Getting straight to business, the artist opened his set with a toned down rendition of his single "Gbona" before heading into the socially-aware "Wetin Man Go Do." It's much calmer of a performance than we're used to seeing from the artist.

Next he performs a funky version of "Dangote," before rounding his set out with his magnum opus of sorts "Ye." He's backed by the band The Outsiders and vocalist Christina Matovu throughout.

Burna Boy has had a stellar year, releasing his seminal album African Giant, performing at Coachella and winning several awards—including 'Best African Act' at the BET Awards—in the process.

Check out his full Tiny Desk performance below, and revisit a recent Tiny Desk performance from British-Nigerian rapper Dave from last week and check out Burna Boy's okay acoustics performance of 'Anybody' from August.

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