Popular
(Screenshot from "Every Woman" video)

Check out Cameroonian Crooner Vagabon’s New Ode to Female Power

The singer dropped a video for new single "Every Woman" today, shot by fellow Cameroonian director Lino Asana.

Cameroonian-born singer-songwriter Laetitia Tamko, better known as her stage name Vagabon, has been spoiling us with delights as of late. First, the crooner teased us with two singles, "Flood" and "Water Me Down" from her forthcoming sophomore album, Vagabon, a work she wrote and produced herself. And today, she surprised us with a new single and video for "Every Woman"—a track Tamko claims is the "thesis of the album," as per a press statement reported by The Fader magazine


"Every Woman" takes its inspiration from a Nayyirah Waheed poem which reads "all the women. in me. are tired." Tamko plays with it and sings instead "All the women I meet are tired" and other slight variations over a simple and lilting, lullaby like strumming guitar—the absence of percussion making her words and her voice that much more prescient of the female power she is singing about. It's the kind of track that, if you were at a cafe on a Sunday morning, would make you look out the window appreciatively in a way looks deep, reflective. Tamko says the track is "an ode to all those who feel different and who actively search and fight for space."

Vagabon - Every Woman (Official Video) youtu.be

The video, shot by fellow Cameroonian Lino Asana, is features Tamko in a simple setting going about her day and playing music in and around a bubble—a sort of bastion of peace, her fort in the wilderness. It evokes Tamko's childhood in Cameroon and what she says was a way of living "simply and humbly"—a feeling she doesn't think could have been as well captured with a director that did not share her country. Vagabon's upcoming self-titled album is due out this Friday, be on the lookout for it and catch her on her upcoming North America tour.

Interview
Image supplied.

Interview: How Stogie T’s ‘Freestyle Friday’ Became a TV Show

Freestyle Friday started as lockdown content but is now a fully-fledged TV show on Channel O. In this interview, Stogie T breaks down why the show is revolutionary and talks about venturing into media.

When South Africa was put under a hard lockdown in 2020, Stogie T started Freestyle Friday to "make SA rap again." Freestyle Friday, hosted on Instagram, saw a different cohort of rappers each rap over the same beat picked by the veteran rapper. From niche and emerging rappers to some of the most notable names in South African hip-hop—the likes of AKA, Focalistic, Ginger Trill and several others all participated.

In the last few weeks, however, Freestyle Friday has found its way to cable TV. The show airs every Friday on Channel O, one of the continent's longest-running music TV channels. Freestyle Friday as a TV programme isn't just about freestyles, it's about the art of rapping and the music business, particularly SA hip-hop. Guests range from lyricists to record executives and other personalities aligned with the scene—Ninel Musson and Ms Cosmo for instance.

But Freestyle Friday is only the first media product Stogie T is working on as he is in the process of starting a podcast network, a venture in which he is collaborating with Culture Capital. In the Q&A below, Stogie T breaks down the relationship with Culture Capital, how the show moved from the internet to TV, why it's a revolutionary idea, touches on his venture into media and his future plans.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Interview: Made Kuti Talks Afrobeat, Activism & Family Legacy

We speak with Made about his debut album and the part he's playing in keeping the Kuti heritage alive.