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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's 'We Should All Be Feminists' Adapted As An eBook

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's 2013 Ted Talk "We Should All Be Feminists" has been adapted for publication as an eBook via Vintage Books.


2014 has proven a groundbreaking year for literary genius Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Her second novel Half of a Yellow Sun hit the silver screen (and is finally set to open in Nigerian theaters). News broke in June that her best-selling novel Americanah was picked up by Kenyan Oscar-winning actress Lupito Nyong’o, who will bring the diasporic love story to life and also star in the film adaptation of the novel. Abreast all of this attention the Nigerian author is still keeping busy wielding her pen to produce narratives that voice the thoughts, hopes and perspectives of those often unheard of in popular mainstream literary works. Her latest textual offering takes form as a long essay adapted from her TED Talk heard 'round the world (it reached over 1 million views on youtube). The poignant speech We Should All Be Feminists was first delivered back in 2013 at TedxEuston. It experienced resurged popularity back in December after being (rather unexpectedly) sampled on Beyoncé's feminist anthem "Flawless"– though if you’ve only heard the 30-second sample on Queen Bey’s track, please do yourself a favor and watch the whole speech below.

We Should All Be Feminists grapples with what feminism means both in different cultural spheres and in the current political climate of today's society. Through recounting a number of different personal experiences both in Nigeria and the U.S, Adichie describes how she had to unlearn many oppressive understandings about gender that are weaved into the fabric of our society and fed to young girls and boys as they grow into men and woman, sending out a rallying-cry as she proclaims that "more of us should reclaim [feminism]." Adichie's We Should All Be Feminists will be available to purchase as an eBook next Tuesday, July 29th, via Vintage Books. Find out more on the release here. Until then, watch the TED Talk that inspired the publication below.

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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Former President of Botswana Ian Khama Condemns Zimbabwean Government

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