Video

Christian Tiger School Take Over Johannesburg

We talk to Christian Tiger School about South African music, and their "mega smoothie sound" in downtown Johannesburg.


Psychedelic electronic hip hop dream team Luc Veermeer and Sebastian Zanasi took time between sets in downtown Johannesburg to tell us about the blessed birth of their group Christian Tiger School, the nutty things on their collective mind, and what they hope the coming years will bring them. Already fire on Cape Town's music scene, we saw them warm up the Jozi crowd to their ethereal synth melodies and classic era boom baps. For more on CTS check out their "Africa In Your Earbuds" mixtape here and stream their latest LP Third Floor here.

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*BONUS: During our interview, Christian Tiger School posted up in front of pieces from "The Long Wait" by well-known South African street artist Faith 47. See more photos here.

Video Credits:

Producer + Editor: Allison Swank

Videographers: Dylan Valley + Antoinette Engel

Animation: Roberto Colombo

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Photo by Hamish Brown

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(Screenshot from "Every Woman" video)

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