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Apple Music Is Launching In 25 Additional African Countries

The streaming service is expanding its accessibility globally and will launch next month with playlists from the likes of Davido and Angelique Kidjo.

Apple's music streaming service, Apple Music, has announced a global expansion of its services across 52 countries, many of them in Africa.

The service was previously available in just 13 African nations including South Africa, Ghana, Nigeria and Kenya amongst others, but will now extend to 25 more countries. The list includes Angola, Tanzania, Algeria, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Senegal, Namibia, Rwanda and several others, bringing the total number of countries where the service is available to 38.


The service is also being made available across countries in Asia-pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, including Jamaica, the Bahamas, Guyana, St. Lucia and more. The move reflects Apple's desire to increase the use of its devices in these regions.

Though pricing information has not yet been made available, the platform will launch in these countries by offering free six month trials, Billboard reports. The streaming service will hosts regional and country-specific playlists such as "Ghana Bounce," and "Africa Now," and next month, it will release exclusive artist-curated playlists from the like of Davido and Angelique Kidjo.

The expansion is a response to the shifting tides in how media is consumed across the continent. Despite high costs and limited access to the internet in various countries, data suggests that the use of digital services will continue to outpace other forms of consumption such as TV and radio, reports Quartz.

This move means that Apple Music is now more present on the continent than its main competitor Spotify, which is currently available in just five African nations: Morocco, Egypt, Algeria, Tunisia and South Africa.

This could mean increased revenue for local African artists, as it potentially help curb music piracy. See the full list of African countries below.

  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Benin
  • Cameroon
  • Chad
  • Côte d'Ivoire
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Gabon
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Mali
  • Mauritania
  • Morocco
  • Mozambique
  • Namibia
  • Republic of the Congo
  • Rwanda
  • Senegal
  • Seychelles
  • Sierra Leone
  • Tanzania
  • Tunisia
  • Zambia
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Sudan Declares State of Emergency, As Military Dissolves Transitional Government

As the North African country edged closer to democracy, Sudan's military has seized power.

Sudan's military has seized power over the North African country, arresting multiple civilian leaders, including the current Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok. The power-sharing, unstable coalition, called the Sovereign Council, was created as a transitional government after the fall of dictator Omar al-Bashir in 2019, in an attempt to move towards a democratic Sudan.

The Sudanese public has been split in recent weeks as groups protested for a military-run state, while others pushed for a civilian lead, democratic nation. Last week, the Prime Minister vocalized his plans towards a full transition to civilian rule, and his plans to have that body in place by November 17, echoing the voices of thousands of Sudanese demonstrators who showed up in hoards to demand that the promise of Sudan's pro-democracy movement be honored. But on Monday the PM and multiple government ministers and officials were placed under arrest, resulting in Sudan's top general's declaring State of Emergency.

General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan said in a televised statement, "To rectify the revolution's course, we have decided to declare a state of emergency nationwide… dissolve the transitional sovereign council, and dissolve the cabinet." His statement came as soldiers fired live rounds at anti-military protestors, outside of the army headquarters in the capital.

Internet services were cut across the country around dawn and the main roads and bridges into Khartoum shut, before soldiers stormed the headquarters of Sudan's state broadcaster in the capital's twin city of Omdurman, the ministry said. After months of rising tensions in the country, army and paramilitary troops have been deployed across the capital city, Khartoum, with the airports and internet access being shut down. As a result of the coup, hundreds of protestors have taken to the streets, demanding the return of a civilian ruled and the transitional government, the BBC reports.

Demonstrators have spread to a number of Sudanese cities including Atbara, Wad Madani, and Port Sudan, and more are expected to attend the call for action. "We will not leave the streets until the civilian government is back and the transition is back," protest attendee Sawsan Bashir told AFP. While demonstrator Haitham Mohamed says, "We are ready to give our lives for the democratic transition in Sudan."


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