News Brief

A Knight's Tale: Social Media Responses to David Adjaye's Knighting

Read some of the social media messages we received in response to David Adjaye's knighting.

DIASPORA—On Sunday, we posted a picture on our Instagram of British-Ghanaian architect, David Adjaye being knighted on behalf of Queen Elizabeth II. To put it subtly, the photograph—which showed Adjaye bent on a burgundy stool with his head bowed as Prince William conferred his knighthood with a sword—didn't sit well with everyone. Comments rolled in from people who thought the picture evoked images of colonialism and racial subordination.


We later posted the picture on Facebook, and asked followers to tell us how they felt about the photo and whether or not it made them uneasy. The responses were mixed, with some questioning the age-old tradition and the British monarchy's imperialist history, while others saw it as a well-deserved honor for the star architect. Read some of the responses below.

In 2016, Idris Elba was also appointed Knight of the Officer of the British Empire. Responses at the time were mostly congratulatory as the actor announced his knighthood with a photo of him and his mother after the ceremony.

Ghanaian editor in chief of British Vogue, Edward Enninful was also knighted last year. The fashion maven wears his title quite proudly.

Other Black knights throughout history, include Welsh-born singer Shirley Bassey, soccer legend Pelé, Sidney Poitier and Colin Powell. 

Robert Mugabe was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1994, and then stripped of the title in 2008.

The responses that we received helped ignite a conversation that, now more than ever, is certainly worth having. With our history steeped in oppression, it's necessary to call out any and everything we think might reinforce those systems no matter how grand or symbolic they may seem. That's not to say that accolades for black folks don't matter, though. They're useful in helping combat underrepresentation and the outright erasure of our accomplishments.

Needless to say, Adjaye's black brilliance beams, with or without a fancy title.

 

 

 

Interview

This Compilation Shines a Light On East African Underground Music

We talk to a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation from Uganda's Nyege Nyege.

Nyege Nyege, a label in Kampala, Uganda is channelling the confidence brimming over a whole continent. Africa is no longer the future. For dance music, its time is right now.

Music For the Eagles is a compilation released in conjunction with Soundcloud to showcase the best new acts that East Africa has to offer outside the mainstream. A new wave of artists firmly blasting non-conformist energy for you to spasm to. Music that takes you places. Otim Alpha's high BPM wedding frenzy of incessant rasping vocals accompanied by feverous violin will have you clawing the walls to oblivion. Anti Vairas' dancehall from a battleship with super galactic intentions doesn't even break a sweat as it ruins you. FLO's beautiful sirens call, is a skittish and detuned nursery rhyme that hints at a yearning for love but reveals something far more unnerving. Ecko Bazz's tough spiralling vocal over sub-bass and devil trap energy is an anthem that can only be bewailed. And Kidane Fighter's tune is more trance-like prayer. These are only some of the highlights for you to shake it out to.

We got to chat with a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation as they took a break from the studio below.

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