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It's Pop, Not Afro-Pop: On the Impact of Davido's 'Son of Mercy'

Our contributor Sabo Kpade reviews Davido's new EP 'Song of Mercy,' which features songs with Tinashe, Nasty C and Simi.

Earlier this month, Davido released “Gbagbe Oshi,” the first single off his new EP Son of Mercy. Produced by Shizzi, “Gbabge Oshi” has a muscular beat with two significant drum breaks. The first influence is afrobeat via Fela—not the latter day afro-pop incarnation we now have. The other is a borrowed flourish from ragga. This will go down well in clubs.


Real heads will notice that this is not the ill-fated album that was slated for a 2015 release. In fact, looking back now in late 2016, it's incredible to think that monster hits like “Gobe,” “Aye,” “Skelewu” and “Tchelete” were singles meant for an album that has now been jettisoned altogether.

These releases—along with “Dodo,” “Owo Ni Koko” and the many other collaborations—have made him a constant presence in our lives anyway.

There’s certainly a quiet competition going on between him and Wizkid for whose new album will receive the biggest reception. Both artists have delayed their album releases, signed huge distribution deals with Sony and added to ever more impressive business and musical collaborations.

Davido’s new EP has two collaborations with female artists, the first of which, “Maga 2 Mugu” alongside Simi, feels inferior on a project that has “How Long” with Tinashe.

Simi is a competent singer. The problem is that, to my ears, her voice is thin and tiny, damn near close to a whine. It's pleasant but lacks presence. The title’s attempt at pithiness works as an alliteration but the meaning is clunky. Roughly speaking, “Maga” in this context means “going crazy” and “Mugu” means “fool”.

“Coolest Kid In Africa” succeeds mainly because it effectively adapts afrobeats to trap. It's clear that Future is the presiding spirit, especially his flow coupled with outlandish bragging about wealth (“take your iyawo/ take her to Jamo...put some owo in her life”). Buoying the song is a very solid though typical trap verse from South African rapper Nasty C.

Words and Meaning

'Iyawo' - wife (or simply girl in this instant)

'Owo' - money

'Jamo' - Jamaica.

“Return” starts with an earnest admission about a woman with whom Davido's in a relationship, “they misuse her when they cheat,when they beat, when they scratch...and I'm going to be the perfect person for her, for ever,” only for him to say in the next line that he likes “the way she put it on me.”

Besides being a little disturbing, it lacks a clean thematic consistency. Neither is it helpful for the woman in question to swiftly go from an abusive relationship to one that is overly sexual, no matter how benign. It's quite possible that she might want some time to herself in between the first verse and the first hook.

Another gem here and a particularly interesting one is “How Long.” Tinashe’s primary sound is soulful, sultry and a little louche. It is from a lineage that is commonly attributed to Aaliyah but is more precisely Janet Jackson's, especially from her 1993 album Janet onwards.

Tinashe is among the new schoolers (along with Kelela, FKA Twigs, Jhene Aiko, and others) who are at their most effective when cooing into your ear rather than belting from the top of a cliff, while Davido is an afrobeats maestro whose monster hits would set off any party. Whoever decided that these two very different artists belonged on the same soulful house track should get a cut of the substantial future royalties.

Together, riding double, there's no bucking or rearing, making “How Long” a smooth ride of a song.

Significantly, on Apple Music, the EP is denoted as “pop” and not “Afro-pop” or the nonsensical “world music.” It signifies a shift in the perception, commercial viability and maturity of afrobeats, especially now that it is making incursions into the UK, European and US markets.

When asked in a radio interview what artists were featured on his upcoming album, Davido mentioned Rae Sremmurd and Usher. On another stop, he tells of how after a meeting with Usher, the singer asks for Davido’s number and how bowled over he was by this. From all indication, and in no time soon, this feeling will normalise, surely.

Sabo Kpade is an Associate Writer with Spread The Word. His short story Chibok was shortlisted for the London Short Story Prize 2015. His first play, Have Mercy on Liverpool Street was longlisted for the Alfred Fagon Award. He lives in London.

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Introducing OkayAfrica's 100 Women 2020 List

Celebrating African Women Laying the Groundwork for the Future

It would not be hyperbole to consider the individuals we're honoring for OkayAfrica's 100 Women 2020 list as architects of the future.

This is to say that these women are building infrastructure, both literally and metaphorically, for future generations in Africa and in the Diaspora. And they are doing so intentionally, reaching back, laterally, and forward to bridge gaps and make sure the steps they built—and not without hard work, mines of microaggressions, and challenges—are sturdy enough for the next ascent.

In short, the women on this year's list are laying the groundwork for other women to follow. It's what late author and American novelist Toni Morrison would call your "real job."

"I tell my students, 'When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else."

And that's what inspired us in the curation of this year's list. Our honorees use various mediums to get the job done—DJ's, fashion designers, historians, anthropologists, and even venture capitalists—but each with the mission to clear the road ahead for generations to come. Incredible African women like Eden Ghebreselassie, a marketing lead at ESPN who created a non-profit to fight energy poverty in Eritrea; or Baratang Miya, who is quite literally building technology clubs for disadvantaged youth in South Africa.

There are the builds that aren't physically tangible—movements that inspire women to show up confidently in their skin, like Enam Asiama's quest to normalize plus-sized bodies and Frédérique (Freddie) Harrel's push for Black and African women to embrace the kink and curl of their hair.

And then there are those who use their words to build power, to take control of the narrative, and to usher in true inclusion and equity. Journalists, (sisters Nikki and Lola Ogunnaike), a novelist (Oyinkan Braithwaite), a media maven (Yolisa Phahle), and a number of historians (Nana Oforiatta Ayim, Leïla Sy) to name a few.

In a time of uncertainty in the world, there's assuredness in the mission to bring up our people. We know this moment of global challenge won't last. It is why we are moving forward to share this labor of love with you, our trusted and loyal audience. We hope that this list serves as a beacon for you during this moment—insurance that future generations will be alright. And we have our honorees to thank for securing that future.

EXPERIENCE 100 WOMEN 2020

The annual OkayAfrica 100 Women List is our effort to acknowledge and uplift African women, not only as a resource that has and will continue to enrich the world we live in, but as a group that deserves to be recognized, reinforced and treasured on a global scale. In the spirit of building infrastructure, this year's list will go beyond the month of March (Women's History Month in America) and close in September during Women's Month in South Africa.

100 women 2020

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Burna Boy 'African Giant' money cover art by Sajjad.

The 20 Essential Burna Boy Songs

We comb through the Nigerian star's hit-filled discography to select 20 essential songs from the African Giant.

Since bursting onto the scene in 2012 with his chart-topping single, "Like to Party," and the subsequent release of his debut album, L.I.F.E - Leaving an Impact for eternity, Burna Boy has continued to prove time and again that he is a force to be reckoned with.

The African Giant has, over the years, built a remarkable musical identity around the ardent blend of dancehall, hip-hop, reggae, R&B, and afropop to create a game-changing genre he calls afro-fusion. The result has been top tier singles, phenomenal collaborations, and global stardom—with several accolades under his belt which include a Grammy nomination and African Giant earning a spot on many publications' best albums of 2019.

We thought to delve into his hit-filled discography to bring you The 20 Essential Burna Boy Songs.

This list is in no particular order.

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(Photo Illustration by Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Rejoice! WhatsApp Places New Restrictions on Chain Messages to Fight Fake News

To combat the spread of misinformation due to the coronavirus outbreak, users are now restricted from sharing frequently forwarded messages to more than one person.

The rise of the novel coronavirus has seen an increase in the spread of fake news across social media sites and platforms, particularly WhatsApp—a platform known as a hotbed for the forwarding of illegitimate chain messages and conspiracy theories (if you have African parents, you're probably familiar). Now the Facebook-owned app is setting in place new measures to try and curb the spread of fake news on its platform.

The app is putting new restrictions on message forwarding which will limit the number of times a frequently forwarded message can be shared. Messages that have been sent through a chain of more than five people can only subsequently be forwarded to one person. "We know many users forward helpful information, as well as funny videos, memes, and reflections or prayers they find meaningful," announced the app in a blog post on Tuesday. "In recent weeks, people have also used WhatsApp to organize public moments of support for frontline health workers."

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Sarkodie Hits Hard With His Latest Single 'Sub Zero'

The Ghanaian heavyweight rapper shows up with the fire bars over an Altra Nova-produced beat.

Sarkodie has dropped a new aggressive track in the shape of "Sub Zero."

"Sub Zero" follows the star Ghanaian rapper as he throws back criticisms that have come his way from other rappers with his own ice cold flow. The new track was produced by Ghanaian beatmaker Altra Nova and mixed by PEE On Da BeaT.

"Sub Zero" follows Sarkodie's turn-up single "Bumper," which dropped bak in February.

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