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The Queen of Afrobeats Finds Community Wherever She Lands | Presented By Uber

We spend the day with Yemi Alade before her big concert in NYC

Sponsored content from Uber

Yemi Alade is the queen of Afrobeats—a global pop star who is constantly on the move. The touring life means she can be hard to pin down.

We caught up with her this month when she landed in New York for "OkayAfrica's Mzansi Heat and Naija Beats" at Lincoln Center.

Her work days are carefully scheduled affairs, moving herself and her crew quickly from the airport to the studio to the stage. For this, she tells OkayAfrica, she relies on she relies on the Stress-Free Pick Ups features from Uber. Their On-Time Guarantee means that she never misses her frequent trans-Atlantic flights or important sound-checks.

"I'm not talking just New York," says Alade, "but in Nigeria and anywhere in the world."

"I might have an appointment at 12 and can book it at 9 am. I don't need to worry. All I know is I need to come downstairs or come outside and the ride is right there. Right on time," she adds.

Yemi Alade performing at OkayAfrica's Mzansi Heat and Naija BeatsPhoto by Oluwaseye Olusa

In fact, Uber guarantees that your ride will arrive during the time period you select—or you'll receive credit towards your next ride.

The world is eternally unpredictable, throwing up barriers and messing up plans. For Alade, the solution is the people she surrounds herself with. "Community," she says, "is very important." These relationships are the building blocks of our towns and cities and the globe.

In a messy world, dependable services are what keeps her artistic community connected to each other, an essential element to creating the inventive and original music that Alade's fans expect of her.

Check out the video for more of Alade's thoughts on inspiration, spirituality and being a woman working and thriving in a male-dominated industry

"What's most important to me," says Alade, "is that I am doing it for my own personal happiness. Because I feels that I deserve it. I do what I love and love what I do."

Learn more about how Uber is headed in a new direction here.


Video Credits:

Director: Brittany "B.Monét" Fennell

Producer: Ayana Barber

Producer: Oyinkan Olojede

Editor: Nick Caiazza

Director of Photography: April Maxey

Director of Photography: Greg Poole

Sound Mixer: Rob Albrecht

Production Assistant: Ross Mayfield

Production Company: Keep Productions Inc

Audio
Photo: Tjeerd Braat. Courtesy of Marieme.

The 11 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Bas, Ycee, Major League, Moonchild Sanelly, Niniola, Indigo Stella, Fireboy DML, Marieme and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our best music of the week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

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Still from YouTube

Watch Fireboy DML's New Music Video for 'Need You'

The buzzing Nigerian artist shares the video for the standout single from his debut album "Laughter, Tears and Goosebumps."

Buzzing Nigerian artist Fireboy DML has shared the music video for his latest single "Need You," one of the standouts from his warmly received debut album Laughter, Tears and Goosebumps.Laughter.

The track is an emotive love ballad, that sees the artist singing about the strong feelings he has for his partner over mellow guitar riffs. The song was produced by Pheelz.

The music video, directed by Clarence Peters, shows the artist and a love interest as they try and escape together, and later get caught up with the bad guy that's out to separate them. The events lead to a tragic ending for the couple. It's the fourth music video offering from Laughter, Tears and Goosebumps. "Of course, it's a tale of love—of finding it again, of learning that time is fickle and you have to treasure what you hold dear while you still can," wrote Fireboy about the song on Twitter.

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Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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