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D'banj Will Make His Nollywood Debut in Jadesola Osiberu's 'Sugar Rush'

The film will reportedly hit the big screen this Christmas.

Over the past few years, Nigerian artist D'banj has been on somewhat of a hiatus. Following the success of his smash hit "Oliver Twist" from the 2017 album King Don Come, he admittedly flew under the radar for a while. In 2018, he returned to the music scene with a few tracks including "Something for Something", a collaboration he did with South African artist Cassper Nyovest, and "Shake It", a track he hopped onto with Tiwa Savage.

More recently this year, D'banj released the vibrant track "Shy" and went on to give a stellar performance at the inaugural edition of the Afro Nation Festival in Portugal. Now it seems that the artist is looking to flex his acting muscles in his debut role in Nigerian filmmaker Jadesola Osiberu's Sugar Rush.


Osiberu took to Instagram to announce her new project and some of the talent she's rounded up for it. D'banj will star in the film alongside Adesua Etomi, Bisola Aiyeola and Omoni Oboli. Whilst details of the film's storyline are yet to be revealed, it is reported that the film will be hitting the big screen this coming Christmas. No stranger to producing blockbuster hits within Nollywood, Osiberu was behind the 2017 romantic comedy Isoken as well as local Nigerian television shows Rumor Has It and Gidi Up.

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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