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Deeper Than The Headlines: Oxfam's Africa, Drone Surveillance + More Drone Surveillance

Check out the latest news on Africa with in-depth African news featuring opinion pieces from global sources.


This week we continue to bring you the latest news on Africa with selections from different media outlets around the globe. Be sure to check back each Thursday for pieces that dig deeper than the headlines on the latest news on Africa!

1. Talking Around the DRC

By: Gado

Most of the selections this week have to do with drone surveillance in the DRC. The cartoon above frames the conversation pretty well. "Gado, full name Godfrey Mwampembwa, is one of Africa's most influential cartoonists. He draws a daily cartoon for Kenyan newspaper The Nation, and his work has appeared in various other publications, such as Le Monde, The Washington Times and The Japan Times."

2. Congo-Kinshasa: Does DRC Need Surveillance Drones?

By: The New Times Team

An article from Rwanda's The New Times spells out the Rwandan government's response to the UN's efforts to institute a drone surveillance program in the neighboring DRC. "Olivier Nduhungirehe, Rwanda’s Deputy Permanent Representative to the UN, told The New Times vial e-mail yesterday that whereas Rwanda welcomes the Secretary-General’s intention to reconfigure MONUSCO [UN mission in Congo] by strengthening its capabilities and enhancing its operational mobility in order to implement its mandate, it is reserved on the use of a technology, whose implications are still being assessed. Nduhungirehe said, “We recognise that the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in peacekeeping operations has far-reaching implications on national sovereignty and territorial integrity and thus believe that, as suggested by the UN Special Committee on Peacekeeping (C-34), a clear legal, financial, and technical assessment is needed before any endorsement of such technology is put forth”.

3. Excerpt from the United States Department of State Daily Press Briefing

Continuing with the conversation surrounding intentions to institute drone surveillance in 35 African countries over the next year, All Africa shares an excerpt form the US Department of State Daily Press Briefing where Victoria Nuland, Spokewoman for the Dept. of State answers questions regarding the United States' position on the UN peacekeeping envoy in the DRC and their intention to use surveillance drones. A necessary read if you're looking for contextual information on what the drone program will constitute and there's even a quick mention of Joseph Kony.

4. Oxfam's New Africa campaign reveals a misguided messiah complex

By: Tolu Ogunlesi

Just a few weeks ago, Oxfam launched a new campaign, which attempts to dispel negative stereotypes of Africa that the West has consumed through charity and non-profit campaigns. "The British arm of Oxfam International called images of starving babies and other familiar depictions of Africa over the last quarter-century "manipulative and hopeless," desensitizing potential donors and leading them to the conclusion that conditions in the developing world can never improve." In this piece for the Guardian, Nigerian writer Tolu Ogunlesi poses a plethora of valid questions and hesitation towards the new campaign. Ogunlesi states, "That's, in a nutshell, the story. It left me a tad puzzled. A w-t-f puzzlement. As in: is Oxfam for real? Let's even forget, for a moment, that Oxfam has probably done far more than any other organisation in propagating these images. Let's focus on something else that struck me about the story: the way blame is being placed squarely on the shoulders of the images."

5. Oxfam: African advertising campaign is helping to dispel negative stereotypes

By: Nick Futcher

In response to Tolu Ogunlesi's opinion piece, Nick Futcher (Oxfam's acting Communications Director) penned a piece  for The Guardian as well as defending the context of the campaign, and the intentions of Oxfam to challenge the way people in the UK think about 'Africa'. "The aim of the adverts is not to give a complete and holistic picture of the continent – that would be impossible. We hoped the viewer would question what they thought they knew about Africa and find out more. We are challenging leaders at the G8 to step up the fight against hunger and invest in the progress already achieved."

Check back next Thursday!

>>>Check last week's Headlines here.

News Brief
Photo: Getty

Here's What You Need To Know About The Political Unrest In Sudan

Thousands have been protesting the Sudanese government over the weekend, supporting the military's plans for a coup.

Sudan's transitional government is in turmoil as thousands of citizens conducted a sit-in protest against them, over the weekend. A group of Sudanese citizens have called on the military to disestablish the nation's current government, as the country struggles with the greatest crisis they've seen since the end of former dictator Omar al-Bashir's controversial ruling, two years ago. The weekend's pro-military protests come as anti-military protestors took to the streets earlier this month to fight for civilian-ruled laws.

Military-aligned demonstrators assembled outside of the famously off-limits entrance of the Presidential Palace located in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum on Monday. Gatherers set up tents, blocking off access to two main intersections, cutting off access to the capital for those inside. Police attempted to wave off crowds with teargas, with Khartoum state officials saying they had, "repelled an attempted assault on the seat of government," in a statement issued Monday.

The assembly was called for by a coalition of rebel groups and political parties that support Sudan's military, accusing the civilian political parties of mismanagement and monopolizing power under their ruling. Demonstrations began on Saturday, but Sunday's gathering saw a lower attendance. According to Reuters, by Monday afternoon, thousands, between 2,000 - 3,000, had returned to voice their concerns. 52-year-old tribal elder Tahar Fadl al-Mawla spoke at the helm of the sit-in outside of the Presidential palace saying, "The civilian government has failed. We want a government of soldiers to protect the transition." Alongside a 65-year-old Ahman Jumaa who claimed to have traveled more than 900 kilometers (570 miles) from Southern region Nyala to show his support.

Protesters are demanding the appointment of a new cabinet that is "more representative of the people who participated in the December 2019 revolution that eventually led to the ousting of former president Omar al-Bashir", Al Jazeera reported from Sudan. Protesters headed towards the Presidential Palace, where an emergency cabinet meeting was being held when they were met by police forces.

Pro-civilian political parties have plans for their own demonstration on Thursday, the anniversary of the 1964 revolution that overthrew Sudan's first military regime under Ibrahim Abboud and brought in a period of democracy that the country still struggles to uphold.


Sudanese Twitter users shared their thoughts online, with many drawing similarities between the current unrest and other political crises the nation has faced.


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