Arts + Culture

Diaspora Eats: 10 of the Best African Restaurants in London

Some of the best African food that London has to offer.

DIASPORA—It’s “No Borders” month here at OkayAfrica, which means we’ll be highlighting travel and intercontinental relations between people on the continent and in the diaspora.


Food is a major part of the travelling experience, and if you're like us, then you’re looking for tasty delectables in any city that you might find yourself in. Good food only amplifies the travelling experience and thankfully, the diaspora is brimming with a variety of restaurants that offer savory dishes that’ll make your trip even more memorable. They might even remind you of mom’s cooking.

Whether you’re looking for options to fit your dietary restrictions or you’re simply looking to stuff your face with quality eats, there’s a spot in the city that will cater to your palette. Below are 10 African restaurants to check out while you’re in London.

Check out some of the best African food in ParisDCHouston, and New York

805

With locations in Southwark and Hendon Central, this restaurant’s mission is to serve good Nigerian food presented in a creative way. Their dishes are sure to be both a feast on the eyes and on the palate. Doesn’t their Monika Fish look yummy?

Momo

The popular eatery in Mayfair, offers a selection of classic Moroccan dishes like Zaalouk, Couscous, and Tagine. If you’re in the mood to share, try the Couscous Mechoui for two, a slow cooked whole lamb shoulder marinated in a secret spice accompanied by semolina.

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Adulis

With three locations in Oval, Clapham Junction, and Brixton, this restaurant offers traditional Eritrean dishes such as Injera and Tsebi.

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Tasty’s

If you’re on a budget, live in South East London or Kent, and are in need of some Nigerian comfort food, this popular chain restaurant has you covered. Some of our favorites include the Ofada Stew and Ewariro.

The Queen of Sheba

This family-owned restaurant in Kentish Town offers a selection of traditional Ethiopian dishes. If you’re vegetarian make sure to try the Goman Injera which consists of cottage cheese and spinach rolled in Ethiopia’s signature sourdough flatbread.

Khamsa

Located in Brixton, this BYOB restaurant’s mission is to offer hearty North African food at a reasonable price. Be sure to sample their 15p/head party menu for an authentic overview of Algerian cuisine. Standout dishes include their Spiced Meatballs and Vegetarian Tagine.

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Vivat Bacchus 

Located a few steps away from the London Bridge on Tooley Street, this restaurant offers a fusion of South African, French, and Italian food. Whether you’re in the mood for Wild Mushroom Risotto or Ostrich Steak with Biltong Crust, the staff is likely to recommend a wine pairing to go alongside your dish.

Zamsareh Jambo 

Looking to get your fix of Chapati, Matooke or Goat Curry without breaking the bank? Be sure to check out this Ugandan restaurant in North London.

Zoe's Ghana Kitchen 

With two pop-up locations in Brixton and Soho and a catering service, this restaurant offers traditional Ghanaian dishes like Groundnut Soup, Bambara Bean Stew and Tatale, with a twist. If you can't make it and want to sample some of the dishes check out owner Zoe Adjonyoh recently published cookbook.

Jamma Rekk 

This catering service fuses Gambian and Caribbean food to your tummy’s delight! For more information on their current menu and where to find them check out their website. But for now feast your eyes on this delicious Gambian Veg Stew.

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Photo by KOLA SULAIMON/AFP via Getty Image

#EndSARS: 1 Year Later And It's Business As Usual For The Nigerian Government

Thousands filled the streets of Nigeria to remember those slain in The #LekkiTollGateMassacre...while the government insists it didn't happen.

This week marks 1 year since Nigerians began protests against police brutality and demanded an end to the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS). The #EndSARS protests took the world by storm as we witnessed Nigerian forces abuse, harass and murder those fighting for a free nation. Reports of illegal detention, profiling, extortion, and extrajudicial killings followed the special task force's existence, forcing the government to demolish the unit on October 11th, 2020. However, protestors remained angered and desperate to be heard. It wasn't until October 20th, when soldiers opened fire on demonstrators at Lekki tollgate in the country's capital, Lagos, that the protests came to a fatal end. More than 56 deaths from across the country were reported, while hundreds more were traumatized as the Nigerian government continued to rule by force. The incident sparked global outrage as the Nigerian army refused to acknowledge or admit to firing shots at unarmed protesters in the dead of night.

It's a year later, and nothing has changed.

Young Nigerians claim to still face unnecessary and violent interactions with the police and none of the demands towards systemic changes have been met. Fisayo Soyombo the founder of the Foundation for Investigative Journalism, told Al Jazeera, "Yes, there has not been any reform. Police brutality exists till today," while maintaining that his organization has reported "scores" of cases of police brutality over this past year.

During October 2020's protests, Nigerian authorities turned a blind eye and insisted that the youth-led movement was anti-government and intended to overthrow the administration of current President Muhammadu Buhari. During a press conference on Wednesday, in an attempt to discredit the protests, Minister of Information and Culture Lai Mohammed hailed the Nigerian army and police forces for the role they played in the #EndSARS protests, going as far as to say that the Lekki Toll Massacre was a "phantom massacre with no bodies." These brazen claims came while protesters continued to gather in several major cities across the country. The minister even went on to shame CNN, Nigerian favorite DJ Switch as well as Amnesty International, for reporting deaths at Lekki. Mohammed pushed even further by saying, "The six soldiers and 37 policemen who died during the EndSARS protests are human beings with families, even though the human rights organizations and CNN simply ignored their deaths, choosing instead to trumpet a phantom massacre."

With the reports of abuse still coming out of the West African nation, an end to the struggle is not in sight. During Wednesday's protest, a journalist for the Daily Post was detained by Nigerian forces while covering the demonstrations.

According to the BBC, additional police units have been set up in the place of SARS, though some resurfacing SARS officers and allies claim to still be around.

Young Nigerians relied heavily on social media during the protests and returned this year to voice their opinions around the first anniversary of an experience that few will be lucky enough to forget.



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