Arts + Culture

Diaspora Eats: 7 of the Best African Restaurants in Madrid

Here are seven of the best African restaurants in Madrid, Spain.

DIASPORA—The diaspora is brimming with a variety of restaurants that offer savory dishes that’ll  remind you of mom’s cooking.


In our Diaspora Eats series, we highlight these many eateries, and offer recommendations for the best African food in whichever major city you might find yourself in. 

Whether you’re looking for options to fit your dietary restrictions or you’re simply looking to stuff your face with quality eats, there’s a spot in the city that will cater to your palette. Below are 7 African restaurants to check out while you’re in Toronto.

Check out some of the best African food in HoustonLondonNew YorkParis, and Washington D.C.Amsterdam, and Toronto

Nuria

This Ethiopian restaurant located on Calle de Manuela Malasaña is a go-to spot for tasty, authentic Ethiopian cuisine. You'll get all the Ethiopian staples in a welcoming atmosphere. Taste their yebeg wot , we promise you won't be disappointed! Be sure to sample their tej (homemade honey wine). 

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La Cocina del Desierto

This North African restaurant has two locations, one on Barbieri Street and the other on Libertad Street. Not only is the food good but the atmosphere is cozy and transports you straight to the Magreb. Feast on some lamb coucous, tajin, and falafel. If you're not sure where to start, we recommend their tasting menu.

Gonder

This Ethiopian restaurant is just minutes away from the lively Plaza Mayor. Order from their extensive menu of Ethiopian staples, and sample their lentil samosas.

Baobab

Situated in Plaza Nelson Mandela on Calle de Cabestreros, this colorful restaurant serves the best in Senegalese cuisine from Thieboudienne to Maffe. It's one of the city's most popular African spots, and for good reason.

El Mandela

This restaurant—meters away from the Opera of Madrid—offers a unique culinary tour. Taste their Djansang and beef stew, and if you're feeling adventurous tried their exotic zebra or ostrich meat.

 Dakar

This restaurant on Calle del Amparo, offers authentic Senegalese cuisine in a cozy atmosphere. Feast on some Thiep and Dibbi and don't forget to wash it down with some bissap.

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Restaurante Gibraltar

This by the Embajadores park offers tasty Moroccan dishes. Make sure to try their harira soup and their lamb tajine, We swear you'll be coming back for more!

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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