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Image courtesy of NASO.

Discover the Minimalist Designs of Nigerian-Owned Fashion Label NASO

They're set to launch their latest collection at Banana Republic this month.

NASO is a new fashion label founded by first-generation Nigerian-American Uyi Omorogbe, who has made it a point to place social impact and minimalist design at the center of the brand.

Influenced by African aesthetics and manufactured completely on the continent, the brand is invested in building schools in rural ares of Nigeria, and uses a percentage of its earnings in order to do so, says Omorogbe. The brand built its first school in the Nigerian village of Urhokuosa, where Omorogbe's father is from in 2019.

Now, NASO is expanding in a major way with a new partnership with fashion retailer Banana Republic. The line will launch at their flagship store in Manhattan later this month, and it's the first brand to have a pop-up at the store. The hope is that the collaboration will help further NASO's ethically-minded mission. "Our mission is simple: to produce great products, create economic opportunity, and empower the youth of Africa to change their communities and in the process, the world," says Omorogbe. "When our customers wear our clothing, we want them to have a feeling of empowerment, a feeling that makes them think, "Well done," or as we say in Nigeria, NASO."


Their collection features clean designs that appear comfortable and functional, with touches of African flair. "We believe that simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. We marry Western and African culture to create timeless, minimalist pieces for the fashion forward global citizen," says Omorogbe of the designs. "We take simple shapes and silhouettes and accent them with authentic African textiles, creating looks that are subtle, but catch the eye of everyone in the room."

The line will be available at Banana Republic's Manhattan store and online from Feb 20-23. Preview pieces from the collection below and see more via their site and on Instagram.

Image courtesy of NASO.

Image courtesy of NASO.

Image courtesy of NASO.

Image courtesy of NASO.

Image courtesy of NASO.

Image courtesy of NASO.


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Adut Akech poses in winners room after winning the Model of the Year Award during The Fashion Awards 2019 held at Royal Albert Hall on December 02, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Tim Whitby/BFC/Getty Images)

South Sudanese Model Adut Akech Wins Model of the Year at 2019 British Fashion Awards

The 19-year-old model spoke about the need for increased representation in the fashion world during her acceptance speech.

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Justice Mukheli. Courtesy of Black Major/Bongeziwe Mabandla.

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Interview: GuiltyBeatz Proves He's Truly 'Different'

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GuiltyBeatz isn't a new name in the Ghanaian music scene. A casual music fan's first introduction to him would've likely been years ago on "Sample You," one of Mr Eazi's early breakout hits. However, he had scored his first major hit two years before that, in the Nigerian music space on Jesse Jagz' and Wizkid's 2013 hit "Bad Girl." In the years to come, the producer has gone on to craft productions for some of Ghana's most talented artists.

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