Still from the 'Indlovu' official music video.

DJ Zinhle

Watch DJ Zinhle's Music Video F​or 'Indlovu'

South African award-winning DJ Zinhle has shared stunning visuals for her uplifting house single 'Indlovu' featuring Loyiso.

DJ Zinhle has officially dropped the much-awaited visuals for her latest single "Indlovu" featuring Loyiso. The music video comes after the 'Indlovu' single dropped in November last year. DJ Zinhle announced the release of the music video to her fans this Wednesday morning on Twitter and the video is already ranking up the views.


Read: Listen to DJ Zinhle and Loyiso's Uplifting New Track 'Indlovu'

The "Indlovu" music video features, Loyiso, the man behind the smooth, powerful vocals and keeps to DJ Zinhle's message of empowering women. The story follows a young female graduate who is struggling to find a job until she decides to quit applying and taps into her inner artist where she finds a career in the music industry. The video is a bold proclamation directed at young South Africans, especially women, who find climbing the career ladder difficult despite possessing the right academic qualifications. The music video immediately resonated with South African music fans as seen in this Twitter response.

DJ Zinhle who owns a female-only DJ academy stated that the song was about never giving up when it was released last year. She has been in the music industry for over a decade and holds a marketing degree. She rose to prominence through South Africa's loved television dance show Jika Majika. Her 2013 "My Name Is" single featuring dance music queen, Busiswa, caused her to gain ground in the house music scene. She has been churning hits ever since and won the "Pan African Artist of the Year" award at the 2020 Nambian Annual Music Awards (NAMAs) for her dancefloor hit "Umlilo 2.0". The single featured amazing vocals from Mvzzle and Rethabile.

The "Indlovu" music video encapsulates the career journey and motivates everyone to keep grinding, singing and dancing.

Watch the "Indlovu" music video below.

DJ Zinhle - Indlovu ft. Loyiso www.youtube.com

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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