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8 Dope SA Albums and EPs That Came Out This Month

Here are 7 dope South African albums and EPs that dropped in May and fell on our radar.

Take a look at seven South African albums and EPs that dropped in May (and a few from last month) that impressed us.

Seba Kaapstad "Thina"


The jazz band released what's one of the best albums of the year on their Mello Music Group debut. Thina, which uses jazz as its base, flirts with hip-hop, electronic, neo soul, eluding classification by genre. Lyrically, this is a project that's meant to make you feel like you're not alone in the struggle and that even though things may not be going your way, it helps to take a breather, look at the bright side and persevere on.

​Muzi "Stimela Segolide"


Muzi's latest EP tells the story of how black men and women would leave their homes to come work in the mines during the apartheid era. Families were destroyed as the parents found themselves seeing less and less of their kids as possible. Stimela Segolide tells the story in four songs, a music video and merchandise. Muzi sprinkles of South African vintage genres over his electronic production.

Lex LaFoy "22"


Lex LaFoy isn't one to get stuck on the same sound. Having started out as a poet, she became a conscious rapper favoring boom bap production in the mid-2000s. In her 2017 EP Honey Bass, she was rapping over bass-heavy electronic beats. On 22, she flirts with trap, adding her own touches to it. Lex LaFoy is one artist who's managed to frequently update her sound and image without losing her essence.

​Espiquet "Free Will"


Espiquet's latest EP (released in April) is yet another display of skill and sauce. Espiquet is a pleasure to listen to; his interpretation of beats always works, and his baritone contributes to his x-factor. Free Will, with its cloudy trap production and light-hearted subject matter, is proof of Espiquet's adeptness as a rapper and songwriter.

​BCUC "The Healing"


Another hipnotic release from BCUC, consisting of two long songs and a short one. The Healing features Femi Kuti and Saul Williams. You might wanna be ready spiritually before pressing play.

Micr.Pluto "Sonic Atlas"


Sonic Atlas consists of three rich songs—live instrumentation (for instance, the saxophone on "Metanoia") meshes with electronic production. Soul vocals and backpack raps are provided by RHEA BLEK and Raheem Kemet on the songs "Metanoia" and "Run The Block."

​M'tunez-I "iRandizLow"


M'tunez-I laments the scarcity of money on his debut EP. Sonically, the project is prevalently trap, and M'tunez-I uses auto-tune on his raps and vocals. If you ever feel like the rand keeps eluding you, M'tunez-I wants you to know that you aren't on your own.

Tweezy "God Level 3"

Tweezy's third iteration of his God Level EPs is his most diverse—alongside trademark Tweezy production (which is a combination of trap and boom bap), the producer has some kwaito-leaning heat and even traces of Afrobeats.

Interview

Sarkodie Is Not Feeling Any Pressure

The elite Ghanaian rapper affirms his king status with this seventh studio album, No Pressure.

Sarkodie is one of the most successful African rappers of all time. With over ten years of industry presence under his belt, there's no question about his prowess or skin in the game. Not only is he a pioneer of African hip-hop, he's also the most decorated African rapper, having received over 100 awards from close to 200 nominations over the span of his career.

What else does Sarkodie have to prove? For someone who has reached and stayed at the pinnacle of hip-hop for more than a decade, he's done it all. But despite that, he's still embracing new growth. One can tell just by listening to his latest album, No Pressure, Sarkodie's seventh studio album, and the follow-up to 2019's Black Love which brought us some of the Ghanaian star's best music so far. King Sark may be as big as it gets, but the scope of his music is still evolving.

Sonically, No Pressure is predominantly hip-hop, with the first ten tracks offering different blends of rap topped off with a handful of afrobeats and, finally, being crowned at the end with a gospel hip-hop cut featuring Ghanaian singer MOG. As far as the features go, Sark is known for collaborating mostly with his African peers but this time around he branches out further to feature a number of guests from around the world. Wale, Vic Mensa, and Giggs, the crème de la crème of rap in America and the UK respectively all make appearances, as well as Nigeria's Oxlade, South Africa's Cassper Nyovest, and his fellow Ghanaian artists Darkovibes and Kwesi Arthur.

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