Style

Douala's Streets Become A Runway

A new exhibition at MoAD from Hobbs/Neustetter of The Trinity Session looks at how Douala's streets became a runway during Doual'art 2013.

Every three years in Douala, Cameroon, contemporary art centre Doual’art hosts artists from all over the world as part of the Salon Urbain de Douala (SUD). Doual’art was founded in 1991 by Marilyn Douala Bell and Dider Schaub with the aim of supporting the production of contemporary art in Cameroon. Participants in the triennial event create experimental, multi-disciplinary public works relating to themes of urban life and society in Douala.


In 2013, artists worked on installations and pieces around the theme “Douala, Métamorphoses.” Stephen Hobbs and Marcus Neustetter of the Joburg-based contemporary art production team The Trinity Session were commissioned by the Tate to create a piece as part of Tate’s public space/public sphere series for Doual’art. The result was an extraordinary fashion show constructed in collaboration with members of the Vallee Bessengue quarter in Douala. Hobbs and Neustetter collaborated with a coiffure by the name of Thomas (known fondly as "Thomas Fashion") who was born and raised in the area. Using locals rather than professional models, the street became a runway and friends and family from the community formed the audience. Thomas’ hair salon already represents a site of transformation for many in Douala, as he expertly crafts elegant and quirky hairstyles for his customers. The photo and video documentation of each model’s unique styling process will form the basis for the project, entitled Temporary but Permanent: Projects, as it travels in early 2015 to Maboneng, Johannesburg’s Museum of African Design.

The striking topography of Vallee Bessengue was central to the site-specific show, with the relationship between individual, place and landscape as a foundational element of the narrative. Throughout their collaboration, Thomas, Hobbs and Neustetter worked closely with individual narratives and personal aspirations to style each participant according to their unique identities and life stories. Thomas crafted magnificent sculptural hairstyles using found objects as varied as ballpoint pens, seashells and zippers. On a symbolic level, the visuals from the fashion parade present a story of dignity, pride and sumptuous styling. If the photos are anything to go by, Trinity Session’s forthcoming exhibition at MoAD will be something to look forward to in the new year, an inspired offshoot of Doual’art’s 2013 Salon Urbain de Douala.

Natasha Mmonatau was born and raised in Botswana and studies history at Stanford University.

News Brief
Photo by -/AFP via Getty Images

Sudan Declares State of Emergency, As Military Dissolves Transitional Government

As the North African country edged closer to democracy, Sudan's military has seized power.

Sudan's military has seized power over the North African country, arresting multiple civilian leaders, including the current Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok. The power-sharing, unstable coalition, called the Sovereign Council, was created as a transitional government after the fall of dictator Omar al-Bashir in 2019, in an attempt to move towards a democratic Sudan.

The Sudanese public has been split in recent weeks as groups protested for a military-run state, while others pushed for a civilian lead, democratic nation. Last week, the Prime Minister vocalized his plans towards a full transition to civilian rule, and his plans to have that body in place by November 17, echoing the voices of thousands of Sudanese demonstrators who showed up in hoards to demand that the promise of Sudan's pro-democracy movement be honored. But on Monday the PM and multiple government ministers and officials were placed under arrest, resulting in Sudan's top general's declaring State of Emergency.

General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan said in a televised statement, "To rectify the revolution's course, we have decided to declare a state of emergency nationwide… dissolve the transitional sovereign council, and dissolve the cabinet." His statement came as soldiers fired live rounds at anti-military protestors, outside of the army headquarters in the capital.

Internet services were cut across the country around dawn and the main roads and bridges into Khartoum shut, before soldiers stormed the headquarters of Sudan's state broadcaster in the capital's twin city of Omdurman, the ministry said. After months of rising tensions in the country, army and paramilitary troops have been deployed across the capital city, Khartoum, with the airports and internet access being shut down. As a result of the coup, hundreds of protestors have taken to the streets, demanding the return of a civilian ruled and the transitional government, the BBC reports.

Demonstrators have spread to a number of Sudanese cities including Atbara, Wad Madani, and Port Sudan, and more are expected to attend the call for action. "We will not leave the streets until the civilian government is back and the transition is back," protest attendee Sawsan Bashir told AFP. While demonstrator Haitham Mohamed says, "We are ready to give our lives for the democratic transition in Sudan."


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