News Brief

Drake Is Shooting ‘One Dance’ Video in South Africa

Pictures from frenzied fans confirms Drake has been visiting the Rainbow Nation.

Drake’s earworm “One Dance” featuring Kyla and Wizkid is finally getting the official video treatment in South Africa.


This comes as Drizzy broke a UK record Friday, edging out Rihanna’s “Umbrella,” for having the longest-running number one single since there was such a thing as a legal download (RIP Napster).

We suspected something has been stirring for the Champagne Papi when he posted this Instagram photo of crew, Material Culture, part of the “izikhothane” dance-battle subculture created by black youth in South Africa’s townships.

@material_culture sell offfffffff

A photo posted by champagnepapi (@champagnepapi) on

Then photos and videos started surfacing online from frenzied fans confirming the Views rapper has been visiting the Rainbow Nation.

Apparently Drake has been making the rounds at the Melrose Arch and the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory in Joburg, a slight detour from Soweto where he has been shooting the video.

And it appears the Canadian rapper has mended his relationship with Popcaan of Jamaica after the dancehall artist was controversially dropped from the album-version of “Controlla.”

OVOUNRULY @champagnepapi @popcaanmusic

A photo posted by Word On Road (@wordonrd) on

Once the video, directed by Anthony Mandler, hits the internet, which could be at any moment now, we’ll let you know. In the meantime, check this:

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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