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The #DrogbaChallenge Is the Latest Dance Craze You Need to Get Into

These young dancers' take on the #DrogbaChallenge has too much sauce, too much juice.

It's high time you get hip to the #DrogbaChallenge if you haven't already.

The artist behind the backing track, "Drogba (Joanna)," is Ivorian-British artist Afro B, a pioneer of AfroWave—a sound from the UK that blends dancehall, afrobeats and rap. Those said elements can be seen in the dance moves these talented folks share with the world.

Just like Niniola's "Maradona" and when Davido laments, "I don't want to be a player no more/'Cause my friends call me Cristiano" in "Fall," there's an organic blend of football references in popular African music. In Afro B's track, his nods to the Ivorian living legend, Didier Drogba.

Ever since "Drogba" dropped in the middle of last month, there's been a plethora of cool kids from the diaspora vibing to the track in viral dance videos—and we had to share our favorites with you all.

Here's 10 of them.


1. Her facial expressions are everything—she's essentially saying, "Having this much finesse is nothing."

2. Effortless swag.

3. There's no way dance moves this fly come this easy.

4. Even Afro B himself had to get into his own challenge.

5. Yasssss sis!

6. Uncle's got all the moves.

7. Obsessed with how they include the 'shaku shaku' in their routine.

8. Make sure whoever's recording you dance gasses you up like she does.

9. The end blows the whole room away.

10. They kill it all the way from France.

Photos courtesy Bruce IV.

Photo Series: Inside Nigeria’s Egungun Festival​

Rooted in the Yoruba word for masquerade, the centuries-old festival honors ancestors, with a striking display of costumes and masks.

In Nigeria, one of the several cultural practices that remains today, despite the massive conversion of the Yoruba people to Christianity and Islam, is the Egungun festival. Egungun is the Yoruba word for masquerade, and it’s recognized as the return of an ancestral spirit from heaven, reemerging on earth to bless the people and the community.

The Egungun festival has become a popular communal festival held annually to honor ancestors, as well as keep their memories alive. It’s celebrated in numerous towns and villages across the South-West region of Nigeria–a region predominantly occupied by the Yorubas. One such town is Iragbiji, a hilly area surrounded by enormous rocks, situated 15 kilometers northeast of the state capital, Osogbo, and founded 600 years ago. The Egungun festival in Iragbiji is reportedly as old as the town itself, and is usually held annually around May, spanning seven days filled with countless activities and events.

On the festival eve, the Egungun, a hidden fellowship of people, led by the leader, pay a visit to the forest of the deities to receive the spirits of the Egungun and bring them back home. This officially marks the beginning of the festival.

Nigerian's celebrate Egungun Festival.Photos courtesy Bruce IV.

This year, the energy that came with the festival season could hardly be missed. For someone who’s witnessing the festival for the first time, one cannot help but be taken aback. Even though Iragbiji is rife with old buildings and dilapidated roofs, several of its inhabitants carry a refreshing vitality — many of them young — that keeps the town alive. Unlike Lagos and Abuja, motorcycles are the most common form of transportation in the town, and at the same time, the pace feels unhurried. Narrow roads filled with people trooping all over the place. Crews of young men holding long canes jumped in front of motorcycles to hinder movement, demanding money in the spirit of the season. All while elderly men, seated in front of their fenceless houses, looked on with a sense of longing.

It’s believed that each clan has at least one Egungun, and so each has a specific day allotted to it during the festival, some attracting more people than others.

Nigerian's celebrate Egungun Festival.Photos courtesy Bruce IV.

As is customary, each day, up until the seventh, sees these Egungun come out of their homes to parade the town, which is usually filled with throngs of people seated at different vantage points. Each Egungun comes out with its clan members alongside drummers who continually strike their instruments vigorously and viciously, as the Egungun dance about. They move from house to house, stopping to bless each one. One might be forced to believe that Egungun are diabolical in nature because of the voluminous amount of charms in their regalia, but the moment you come into contact with any Egungun, they immediately rain down torrents of prayers on you. As they do this, one might be expected to give the Egungun and its clan members a little compensation for their prayers.

Encountering an Egungun as a stranger in Iragbiji might at first come off as a terrifying thing, but one quickly realizes that they carry no ill intent, regardless of how scary their costumes might be. Generally, their aim isn’t to harm onlookers but to instead entertain. And sometimes, this entertainment can be predominantly violent in nature as followers of the Egungun wielding canes begin to flog themselves vehemently. The flogging is somewhat ritualistic and can appear frightening but seeing the joy that it evokes amongst the crowd tells an onlooker everything they need to know: It is merely entertainment.

Check out our gallery from this year’s festival:

Nigerian's celebrate Egungun Festival.

Photos courtesy Bruce IV.

Photo by Joshua Okocha.

Burna Boy is the First African Artist to Sell Out London Stadium

The Nigerian superstar became the first African artist to sell out London’s 80,000-capacity stadium, during his June 3rd performance. The U.S. is next, where he'll be the first African artist to headline a stadium, at New York's Citi Field.

Africa’s Giant is showing no signs of slowing down on his mission to dominate stages across the globe. This weekend, Grammy-Award-winning singer-songwriter Burna Boy became the first African artist to sell out the U.K.’s London Stadium – the city’s 80,000-capacity multi-purpose arena. “I told them I’m a genius”, the singer said as he made the incredible feat with no warm-up acts and continues to take his Love, Damini tour beyond his wildest dreams.

The three-hour show seemed to be an event to remember. A fan-posted video showed the singer’s reaction to the massive crowd singing his hit single "It’s Plenty" back to him. The 60,000-strong audience joined Burna in celebrating how far African music, more specifically Afrobeats, has soared in the last few years. Offering a delicious career-spanning collection of hits, the singer and the crowd were in agreement on how much energy was needed to truly appreciate the moment. Burna’s latest accomplishment has seemingly become his modus operandi as he’s previously sold out London’s Wembley and O2 Arenas, and earlier this year he set himself up to be the first African artist to headline a U.S. Stadium.

London Stadium took to their official Twitter account to announce the singer’s historic occasion saying, “NOW SOLD OUT @burnaboy’s RECORD-BREAKING concert has now officially SOLD OUT. What an incredible achievement for the first-ever African artist to solo headline a U.K. stadium. For those lucky enough to make it, enjoy the show.” The star replied, in a now edited Tweet, “I told them I’m a genius.” However, sweet words still made available to his Twitter fans read, “Believe. Sold Out Business. Thank you, London and love to everyone that supported me in making history. Till the next one.”

Burna brought out a host of fellow global hitmakers to make the most of his and the fans’ experience. The singer brought out British rappers Stormzy, and Jhus to perform ‘Real Life’ with the former, and Jamaican artist Popcaan got his chance to deliver a stellar performance of their collab ‘Aboboyaa’ with the man of the evening. Burna was also sure to pay tributes to his former collaborator, the late Indian rapper ‘Sidhu Moose Wala’ as he gave a heartwarming rendition of their single ‘Mera Na’, which was released after the artist’s passing.

London Stadium did its due diligence in awarding the singer with a prestigious plaque, solidifying his amazing accomplishment and the indescribable success Burna Boy has created for himself.

Fans took to social media to help celebrate the artist’s achievement:






(YouTube)

The Best Nigerian Songs Right Now

Featuring new Nigerian music from Asake,Olamide, CKay, Wande Coal, Teni, Oxlade, Joeboy and more.

Every month, Nigerian music artists release new songs in hopes of momentarily owning the hearts and ears of current and new fans amidst a barrage of new Nigerian releases.

Here’s a list of the latest songs from Nigeria this month for your viewing and listening pleasure.

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