News Brief

The Egyptian Government Has Arrested 33 People For Raising Rainbow Flags At a Concert

The Egyptian government is currently "leading a crackdown against LGBT people," reports Amnesty International.

The Egyptian government has detained a total of 32 men and one woman in the past four days in what Amnesty International is calling "a campaign against LGBT people."


The arrests come after several people raised rainbow flags during a concert in Cairo last month by Lebanese band Mashrou' Leila, a group which is fronted by an openly gay lead singer.

The flag-raising caused an uproar in the country, and three days later Public Prosecutor Nabil Sadek, launched an investigation into the incident stating that it "incited homosexuality."

Six men who were tied to the flag-raising incident stood trial on Sunday along with 10 other men who were arrested the week before. A verdict is set to be reached on October 29. One woman has been charged with "sexual deviancy."

Egyptian security forces have carried out anal examinations on five men who've been detained, reports Amnesty International.

“In a matter of days the Egyptian security forces have rounded up dozens of people and carried out five anal examinations signalling a sharp escalation in the authorities' efforts to persecute and intimidate members of the LGBTI community following the rainbow flag incident," says Najia Bounaim, North Africa Campaigns Director at Amnesty International.

"This is the worst crackdown against people based on their perceived sexual orientation since the mass arrests of 52 people following a raid on the Queen Boat, a floating nightclub on the Nile, in 2001."

Though homosexuality is not explicitly illegal in the country, but people suspected of being part of the LGBTQ community are often prosecuted under veiled charges such as "debauchery", "immorality" or "blasphemy," reports BBC Africa.

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Photo courtesy of Film Movement.

'Rafiki,' Trevor Noah's 'The Daily Show,' & More, Earn 2020 GLAAD Award Nominations

The GLAAD awards recognize "fair, accurate and inclusive representations" of the LGBTQ community in media.

The nominations for the annual GLAAD Media Awards, which "recognize and honor media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) community and the issues that affect their lives," have just been announced, and several of our favorite shows this year have earned nominations.

Wanuri Kahiu's groundbreaking film Rafiki earned a nomination in the "Outstanding Film Limited Release" category. The acclaimed lesbian love story was the first Kenyan film to screen at Cannes. We caught up with the director to discuss the film back in May of last year.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Photo by Romain Chanson/AFP via Getty Images.

Three Protesters Killed During Anti-Government Demonstrations in The Gambia

These are the first deaths to be reported since the protests against President Adama Barrow began.

Ongoing anti-government protests in The Gambia have turned deadly. Aljazeera reports that this past Sunday, three protesters were killed while protesting for President Adama Barrow to resign. These are the first reported deaths since the protests began a few months ago.

Several other protesters were injured after the police fired tear gas and rubber bullets in an attempt to disperse the massive crowds.

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John Legend (seated at piano) and DJ Khaled perform onstage during the 62nd Annual GRAMMY Awards at STAPLES Center on January 26, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording Academy)

Grammys 2020: Performers Pay Tribute to Nipsey Hussle In Traditional Eritrean Attire

During a Grammy tribute, featuring John Legend, Kirk Franklin, Meek Mill and more, a group of dancers paid homage to the late rapper's Eritrean heritage, by sporting traditional garb.

The 2020 Grammys have been one of great reflection, as various artists and public figures that we've lost recently have received tributes.

One of the artists commemorated tonight was the late Eritrean-American rapper, Nipsey Hussle who was killed in March of last year in his hometown of Los Angeles. His tribute featured performances from artists like John Legend, Meek Mill, DJ Khaled, Kirk Franklin, as well as fellow LA rappers YG and Roddy Rich.

The tribute opened with a heartfelt performance from Meek Mill. Later, during a rendition of their collaboration "Higher," DJ Khaled and John Legend brought out a group of dancers dressed in traditional zurias and other Eritrean attire—a tribute to the late rapper's unique heritage. "I'm half American and half Eritrean—as much as I am a black person from America, I am a black person from Africa too," Nipsey once said in an interview.

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