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Egyptian Singer, Shyma, Has Been Sentenced To 2 Years In Prison For "Inciting Debauchery" In Video

Shyma has been found guilty of "inciting debauchery" for her music video "I Have Issues."

Egyptian pop singer, Shyma, will serve two years in prison, after being found guilty of "inciting debauchery," with the release of her music video "I Have Issues."

Following the video, which has now been removed from YouTube, and shows the singer dancing sensually in her underwear while eating an apple and banana "suggestively," The 25-year-old singer posted an apology on a now deactivated Facebook Page in response to the public outcry it fueled.

Here's a short clip from the video:

"I apologize to all the people who saw the clip and were upset by it and took it in an inappropriate way," she wrote. "I didn't imagine all this would happen and that I would be subjected to such a strong attack from everyone, as a young singer... who has dreamt from a young age of being a singer."

The music video's producer was also sentenced to two years in prison.

It seems as though this type of ill-considered wielding of moral law has reached new depths in Egypt as of late.

Last month, Egyptian television host, Doaa Salah, was sentenced to three years, for the same offense after she reportedly "encouraged single motherhood" on her show.

According to BBC Africa, another Egyptian singer, Sherine Abdel Wahab, is facing trial for supposedly "spreading provocative publicity," and has been banned from performing in the country for two months after suggesting that drinking form The Nile could cause illness, at a concert last year.

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(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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Former President of Botswana Ian Khama Condemns Zimbabwean Government

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