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Egypt's First Democratically-Elected President, Mohamed Morsi, Has Been Laid to Rest

The former statesman has been buried alongside other figures of the now-banned Muslim Brotherhood.

Yesterday, former President Mohamed Morsi suffered a fatal heart attack in a Cairo court while he was on trial for espionage charges. Morsi was the first head-of-state to be democratically elected in Egypt's modern history following President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year rule. However, he was eventually ousted by the military in 2013 after continuous protests calling for him to step down.


Whilst many are not particularly aggrieved by the death of Morsi following his involvement in the killings of protesters in 2012, others have accused Egyptian authorities and current President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi of his death.

Morsi, who was facing six more trials and serving a 20-year sentence, was reportedly denied medical care and kept in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day—torture, under UN guidelines. Morsi's history of diabetes, kidney and liver disease coupled with the poor conditions of prison, are said to have brought about what the Independent Detention Review Panel predicted would be a "premature death". The panel added that, "The denial of basic medical treatment to which he is entitled could lead to his premature death...The whole overseeing chain of command up to the current president would have responsibility for this."

In the wake of Morsi's death, there have been renewed calls to investigate Egypt's treatment of political detainees.

The now-banned Muslim Brotherhood, the oldest political Islamist group in the Arab world and the organisation to which Morsi belonged, referred to his death as a "full-fledged murder". Morsi was reportedly buried next to other senior figures of the Muslim Brotherhood according to a statement released by his son, Abdullah Mohamed Morsi, on social media.

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Sarkodie Is Not Feeling Any Pressure

The elite Ghanaian rapper affirms his king status with this seventh studio album, No Pressure.

Sarkodie is one of the most successful African rappers of all time. With over ten years of industry presence under his belt, there's no question about his prowess or skin in the game. Not only is he a pioneer of African hip-hop, he's also the most decorated African rapper, having received over 100 awards from close to 200 nominations over the span of his career.

What else does Sarkodie have to prove? For someone who has reached and stayed at the pinnacle of hip-hop for more than a decade, he's done it all. But despite that, he's still embracing new growth. One can tell just by listening to his latest album, No Pressure, Sarkodie's seventh studio album, and the follow-up to 2019's Black Love which brought us some of the Ghanaian star's best music so far. King Sark may be as big as it gets, but the scope of his music is still evolving.

Sonically, No Pressure is predominantly hip-hop, with the first ten tracks offering different blends of rap topped off with a handful of afrobeats and, finally, being crowned at the end with a gospel hip-hop cut featuring Ghanaian singer MOG. As far as the features go, Sark is known for collaborating mostly with his African peers but this time around he branches out further to feature a number of guests from around the world. Wale, Vic Mensa, and Giggs, the crème de la crème of rap in America and the UK respectively all make appearances, as well as Nigeria's Oxlade, South Africa's Cassper Nyovest, and his fellow Ghanaian artists Darkovibes and Kwesi Arthur.

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The 7 Best Nigerian Songs of the Month (July)

Featuring Olamide, Lady Donli, Omah Lay, Adekunle Gold, Falz and more.