Photos

This Is What Electrafrique Dakar Looked Like

Last Saturday was the great return of Okayafrica Electrafrique to its new home base in Dakar, check out a gallery of photos from the night.

Last Saturday was the great return of Okayafrica Electrafrique to its new home base in Dakar, after a long summer break that followed an epic show at the Dak’Art Biennale, which featured the versatile Kenyan producer Blinky Bill.


For this new edition, the Okayafrica family teamed up with the Kaani and Jokkolabs collective, who provide different platforms to young creatives to launch projects and grow. The show took the heart of the city by storm, bringing contemporary pan-African vibrations to the depth of the Medina, Dakar’s century-old neighborhood, which is a lively bridge between tradition and modernity.

Many stars were born in this vibrant neighborhood, whose pulses set the tempo of the city. Electrafrique builds on this tradition and culture, aiming to bring a fresh element to the community. In that sense it’s quite symbolic that the show took place at the Maison de la Culture Douta Seck, the home of Senegal’s national orchestra.

The music took the crowd to each corner of the continent, following the flow set by our own DJ Cortega and Tamsir a.k.a. TchoubTchoub, the Senegalese DJ who came through to Dakar for the occasion, from his new base in France. Dakar’s artistic and creative communities rallied for the occasion, dancing the night away to a fusion of traditional and futuristic afro-electronic beats.

Go inside Okayafrica Electrafrique Dakar in these photos by JB Joire. Fashion designer Selly Raby Kane, dancers from Compagnie la Mer Noire, Kenaicha Sy of the Wakh’art cultural collective, and rapper FManel of Skillaz were present, among many other partiers.

Dancers Paula and Kirs of Compagnie la Mer Noire.

Dancer Khoudia of Compagnie la Mer Noire.

Dancer Khoudia of Compagnie la Mer Noire.

TchoubTchoub (right).

Kenaicha Sy of the Wakh’art cultural collective, Rapper FManel of Skillaz, and fashion designer Selly Raby Kane, the new Creative Director for the Design Indaba 2016.

Selly Raby Kane.

Cortega, TchoubTchoub and Don Dazy.

Interview

Sarkodie Is Not Feeling Any Pressure

The elite Ghanaian rapper affirms his king status with this seventh studio album, No Pressure.

Sarkodie is one of the most successful African rappers of all time. With over ten years of industry presence under his belt, there's no question about his prowess or skin in the game. Not only is he a pioneer of African hip-hop, he's also the most decorated African rapper, having received over 100 awards from close to 200 nominations over the span of his career.

What else does Sarkodie have to prove? For someone who has reached and stayed at the pinnacle of hip-hop for more than a decade, he's done it all. But despite that, he's still embracing new growth. One can tell just by listening to his latest album, No Pressure, Sarkodie's seventh studio album, and the follow-up to 2019's Black Love which brought us some of the Ghanaian star's best music so far. King Sark may be as big as it gets, but the scope of his music is still evolving.

Sonically, No Pressure is predominantly hip-hop, with the first ten tracks offering different blends of rap topped off with a handful of afrobeats and, finally, being crowned at the end with a gospel hip-hop cut featuring Ghanaian singer MOG. As far as the features go, Sark is known for collaborating mostly with his African peers but this time around he branches out further to feature a number of guests from around the world. Wale, Vic Mensa, and Giggs, the crème de la crème of rap in America and the UK respectively all make appearances, as well as Nigeria's Oxlade, South Africa's Cassper Nyovest, and his fellow Ghanaian artists Darkovibes and Kwesi Arthur.

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