Photos

This Is What Electrafrique Dakar Looked Like

Last Saturday was the great return of Okayafrica Electrafrique to its new home base in Dakar, check out a gallery of photos from the night.

Last Saturday was the great return of Okayafrica Electrafrique to its new home base in Dakar, after a long summer break that followed an epic show at the Dak’Art Biennale, which featured the versatile Kenyan producer Blinky Bill.


For this new edition, the Okayafrica family teamed up with the Kaani and Jokkolabs collective, who provide different platforms to young creatives to launch projects and grow. The show took the heart of the city by storm, bringing contemporary pan-African vibrations to the depth of the Medina, Dakar’s century-old neighborhood, which is a lively bridge between tradition and modernity.

Many stars were born in this vibrant neighborhood, whose pulses set the tempo of the city. Electrafrique builds on this tradition and culture, aiming to bring a fresh element to the community. In that sense it’s quite symbolic that the show took place at the Maison de la Culture Douta Seck, the home of Senegal’s national orchestra.

The music took the crowd to each corner of the continent, following the flow set by our own DJ Cortega and Tamsir a.k.a. TchoubTchoub, the Senegalese DJ who came through to Dakar for the occasion, from his new base in France. Dakar’s artistic and creative communities rallied for the occasion, dancing the night away to a fusion of traditional and futuristic afro-electronic beats.

Go inside Okayafrica Electrafrique Dakar in these photos by JB Joire. Fashion designer Selly Raby Kane, dancers from Compagnie la Mer Noire, Kenaicha Sy of the Wakh’art cultural collective, and rapper FManel of Skillaz were present, among many other partiers.

Dancers Paula and Kirs of Compagnie la Mer Noire.

Dancer Khoudia of Compagnie la Mer Noire.

Dancer Khoudia of Compagnie la Mer Noire.

TchoubTchoub (right).

Kenaicha Sy of the Wakh’art cultural collective, Rapper FManel of Skillaz, and fashion designer Selly Raby Kane, the new Creative Director for the Design Indaba 2016.

Selly Raby Kane.

Cortega, TchoubTchoub and Don Dazy.

Interview
Photo: Mariela Alvarez.

Interview: ÌFÉ Blends Music & Religion to Honor Those Who Have Died During the Pandemic

Producer and percussionist Otura Mun talks about his latest EP, The Living Dead, and how he traces the influences of West Africa in his new work.

There are bands that open up a spiritual world through their music. ÌFÉ is one example. An electro-futurist band that fuses Afro-Cuban rhythms and Jamaican dancehall with Yoruba mystical voices. With the success of their 2017 debut album "IIII+IIII" (pronounced Eji-Ogbe), ÌFÉ has reached an audience that is looking for Caribbean and contemporary sounds.

The Puerto Rican-based band just released a new EP, The Living Dead- Ashé Bogbo Egun, that aims to heal and honor those who have died during this pandemic. Otura Mun, the band leader, is an African-American producer and percussionist, who began a personal journey about a decade ago, when he landed in San Juan, and decided to move there. He learned Spanish, dug deep into his African ancestry and started to practice the Yoruba-Caribbean religion of Santería.

ÌFÉ, which means "love and expansion" in Yoruba, ties two worlds, music and religion, artistically. This new EP modernized prayer songs to hopefully make them more accessible to a younger generation. OkayAfrica spoke with Otura Mun on his latest work.

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