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Youths from Nigerian origin, protest on October 29, 2020 in the center of Madrid, Spain, by police brutality, after the generalized reports of kidnapping, harassment that is taking place in the country of Nigeria.

#EndSARS: UK Parliament Deliberates Sanctions Against Nigeria

The UK government is considering imposing sanctions on Nigeria after receiving petitions from #EndSARS protestors and supporters of the movement.

According to the BBC, the UK government has deliberated implementing sanctions against Nigeria. This comes after parliament received a petition with over 220 000 signatures from #EndSARS protesters who have highlighted the major human rights violations that occurred over the past few weeks in Nigeria. Admittedly, more targeted sanctions against implicated Nigerian officials were debated after much condemnation of the idea of sanctions was also expressed by various parliamentary members.


READ: #EndSARS: Nigeria is a Nation of Elites and 'Everyone Else'

The debate commenced this past Monday evening with a live stream that lasted over an hour. According to Premium Times Nigeria, the debate was led by Theresa Villiers, a member of parliament and the petition committee. Villiers made remarks about the gross human right violations from the Nigerian government during the recent #EndSARS demonstrations. She stated that there was growing distrust of the Nigerian government after President Muhammadu Buhari stated the disbandment of rogue unit Special Armed Robbery Squad (SARS) and pointed out that it was the fourth time this statement had been made since the establishment of the unit.

The UK government is also reportedly looking at withdrawing development funds but some have decried this, claiming it would affect citizens more than the Nigerian officials themselves. The focus of the debate then moved to sanctioning implicated individuals with possible travel bans. According to PulseNG, "They stressed that government officials responsible for the abuse of human rights in the country should be denied the opportunity to enjoy amenities in the UK."

Nigeria has reportedly started carrying out internal investigations and the UK will be monitoring subsequent developments. Villiers closed the debate with the following remarks: "While the minister has failed to make commitments on targeted sanctions, we believe that this will be taken seriously and investigation and justice will be carried out soon."

Watch the UK parliament debate on sanctions against Nigeria below:

E-petitions relating to Nigeria and the sanctions regime - 23rd November 2020 www.youtube.com

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

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