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Ethiopia Planted a Record-Breaking Number of Trees in a Single Day

In just one day, 350 million trees were planted in the country as part of efforts to tackle deforestation and climate change.

In 2017, India set a new record for the number of trees planted in a single day at 66 million. Almost two years later, Ethiopia has surpassed that record with a colossal figure of 350 million trees. It's certainly no small feat and the East African country is leading the rest of the world when it comes to addressing deforestation and its contribution to the increasingly urgent crisis that is climate change.


Monday's record is by no means a once-off endeavor but a part of a broader national "green legacy" initiative which was launched in May under the leadership of Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed. The initiative hopes to see at least 4 billion trees being planted in a few months time. The Prime Minister, leading by example, joined in on the planting of a few trees in Addis Ababa.

After taking office in March of last year, the Prime Minister has made significant changes. Ahmed officially put an end to the two-decade long tensions and hostilities between Ethiopia and it's neighboring country Eritrea. Additionally, he committed to ensuring that multiparty elections would be held and that political dissidents and critics of the government would no longer be jailed as was the case in the past, the New York Times reports.

Aljazeera reports that a number of schools and government offices were closed to encourage citizens to "go and make their mark" by contributing to the planting. While it is not yet clear whether the Guinness World Records was monitoring the tree planting, the Prime Minister's office expressed that they had the assistance of a unique software with regards to the counting.

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(Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

Pregnant Tanzanian Girls Now Have Hope Of An Education

In the past, Tanzania's pregnant girls of school-going age were banned from accessing an education. However, things are about to change!

If a young girl of school-going age happened to fall pregnant in Tanzania, it usually spelled the end of her schooling career β€” and the death of any prospects she may have had for a bright future. In Tanzania currently, an estimated 5 500 girls are forced to leave school each year due to pregnancy, according to the World Bank.

The Tanzanian government has announced a new programme aimed at addressing the plight of young girls who have been impacted by this discriminatory ban. Tanzania's Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Leonard Akwilapo said young girls will now be offered an opportunity to further their schooling at alternative colleges.

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Nigerian Government Barred From Prosecuting Twitter Users

The Court of Justice of the Economic Community of West African States has ordered the Nigerian government to refrain from prosecuting Twitter users, while it considers the case brought to it by civil society organisations and journalists.