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Ethiopian Airlines is Celebrating International Women's Day With an All Female Crew

All points of control, from the cabin crew to the safety staff, were operated by women.

Ethiopian Airlines has undertaken one of its long-haul flights from Addis Ababa to Oslo and Stockholm today with an all-female crew to mark International Women's Day. This is not the first time that "the Lucys" have taken over the airline. However, it is an ongoing initiative that is aiming to keep gender equality as one of the airline's top priorities.


In 2015, Ethiopian Airlines made its first historic flight out of the continent from Addis Ababa to Bangkok, Thailand with an all-female crew. On a continent where gender inequality still thrives and girl children are not afforded the same opportunities as their male counterparts even from a young age, it is important, if not damn inspiring, to hear a woman's voice coming from the cockpit and announcing itself as the chief whip.

READ: Ethiopian Airlines Embarked Its First Flight to Buenos Aires with an All Women Crew

Speaking on today's flight, the airline's CEO Tewolde GabreMariam said:

"We are immensely honored that we have women trailblazers in every aspect of our aviation field. Women are an integral part of our success story from the start, and with this dedicated flight we honor and celebrate their indispensable contribution to our aviation group and the broader aviation industry, our country and the continent at large."

Aside from Ethiopian Airlines, Air Zimbabwe and Air India have also flown with all-female crews to highlight and promote gender equality in the aviation space.


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(Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

Pregnant Tanzanian Girls Now Have Hope Of An Education

In the past, Tanzania's pregnant girls of school-going age were banned from accessing an education. However, things are about to change!

If a young girl of school-going age happened to fall pregnant in Tanzania, it usually spelled the end of her schooling career — and the death of any prospects she may have had for a bright future. In Tanzania currently, an estimated 5 500 girls are forced to leave school each year due to pregnancy, according to the World Bank.

The Tanzanian government has announced a new programme aimed at addressing the plight of young girls who have been impacted by this discriminatory ban. Tanzania's Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Leonard Akwilapo said young girls will now be offered an opportunity to further their schooling at alternative colleges.

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Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Nigerian Government Barred From Prosecuting Twitter Users

The Court of Justice of the Economic Community of West African States has ordered the Nigerian government to refrain from prosecuting Twitter users, while it considers the case brought to it by civil society organisations and journalists.

Activists and journalists took the Nigerian government to court to challenge the recent Twitter ban, asking "the court to declare the indefinite suspension of Twitter a continuous violation of their human rights under the international law." As it stands the ban threatens to criminalise the 40 million Twitter users in the country.

According to Socio-Economic Rights And Accountability Project (SERAP), a Nigerian NGO, the court ruled that no person should be "sanctioned, harassed, intimidated, arrested or prosecuted for using Twitter in Nigeria.The ruling also means that tech companies must immediately restore people's access to Twitter as a matter of human right."

"The court has listened very well to the objection by Nigeria. Any interference with Twitter is viewed as inference with human rights. This will violate human rights. Nigeria must take immediate steps to implement this order," the court ruling stated.

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Photo by Deon Raath/Rapport/Gallo Images via Getty Images

Spirit Of Humanity Gives Hope To Young Boy Mauled By A Hyena

A 9-year-old Zimbabwean boy Rodwell Nkomazana has a shot at a normal life, again, after a horrific hyena attack left him with half of his face missing.

It takes a village to raise a child and sometimes that village comes from thousands of kilometers away, and consists of committed surgeons, passionate nurses and generous international donors. Nine-year-old Rodwell Nkomazana was asleep at an all-night church service when the unthinkable happened. The little boy was attacked and mauled by a hyena outside Harare, in Zimbabwe.

The medical team at Parirenyatwa Hospital in Harare, where he received his initial treatment, did all they could to save his life and stabilise him. However, due to a lack of resources and expertise, it was all they could do.

With half of his face missing, including an eye, his upper lip, his nose and part of his forehead, Rodwell was set for a life full of challenges. Not only would he have lost his childhood, but he would have probably spent most of his time in seclusion — isolated from the rest of society.

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