News Brief
Photo courtesy of Carhartt WIP.

A Fresh Fela Kuti x Carhartt WIP Pop-Up Is Coming to Okay Space

For one day only, shop the new Fela Kuti x Carhartt WIP collection and check out the New York premiere of "One Day Go Be One Day."

All roads lead to Brooklyn for a pop-up experience you can't miss.

The new Fela Kuti x Carhartt WIP collection pop up is coming to Okay Space for one day only on Thursday, April 4, 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.—with sounds by DJ Buka.


Join us for the the New York premiere of One Day Go Be One Day, the new film about afrobeat legend Fela Kuti by Carhartt Work In Progress, Dazed and NTS Radio. The film was directed by Akinola Davies Jr with music from Obongjayar. You can check out the film trailer on Instagram TV here.

Here's a sneak-peek of the collection you can see in the flesh this Thursday below:

Photo courtesy of Carhartt WIP.

Photo courtesy of Carhartt WIP.

CLICK HERE TO RSVP

Okay Space is located at 281 North 7th Street Brooklyn, NY 11211.

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Fela Kuti and Ginger Baker. (Photo by Echoes/Redferns/Getty Images)

Remembering Ginger Baker's Afrobeat Collaborations With Fela Kuti

After Cream, Baker spent several years in the 1970s living and recording in Nigeria, most notably with Fela Kuti.

Ginger Baker, pioneer British rock drummer and co-founder of the band Cream, passed away yesterday. He was 80-years-old.

"Baker had been suffering from myriad ailments, including chronic respiratory illness and osteoarthritis," Okayplayer reports. "On September 25th, his family asked fans to keep Baker in their prayers, as he'd reached a critical point that warranted hospitalization. And [Sunday] morning, they informed fans on Facebook the drummer had 'passed away peacefully.'"

Baker was well-known across the world for his work with Cream, the group he formed alongside Eric Clapton and Jack Bruce.

Once Cream disbanded—and short stints with projects like Blind Faith and Ginger Baker's Air Force—the drummer turned his attention to Africa, eventually building a recording studio in Lagos, Nigeria.

The documentary, Ginger Baker in Africa, follows him as he traveled by Range Rover from Algeria to Nigeria, across the Sahara Desert. Once he reached Lagos, he started setting up the studio. Though it took some times to figure out, and several setbacks, Batakota (ARC) studios finally opened at the end of January 1973.

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Photos: Here's What 'An OkayAfrica Party' at Lot 45 Looked Like

Pictures from 'An OkayAfrica Party' in Brooklyn with AQ, DJ Mohogany, Legend and Sydney Love.

The latest edition of An OkayAfrica Party at Lot 45 was a night to remember.

All roads led to the Bushwick for another installment of our packed-out parties that see us take over Lot 45. The sounds of the nights hit all of the best afro-fusion cuts you'd want to hear right now and featured sets from AQ, DJ Mohogany, Legend and Sydney Love.

To see what you missed out on (or recollect the night) check out these photos below, all taken by Kevain D. Delpesche.

Take a look.

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Cellou Binani/Getty Images

Several People Have Been Killed During Protests in Guinea

Guineans are protesting against changes to the constitution which will allow President Alpha Conde to run for a third term.

At least five people have died during protests in Guinea's Conakry and Mamou after police opened fire on them, according to Aljazeera. The protests come just after President Alpha Conde instructed his government to look into drafting a new constitution that will allow him to remain in power past the permissible two terms. Conde's second five-year term will come to an end next year but as is the unfortunate case with many African leaders, the 81-year-old is intent on running for office yet again.

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Photo by Hamish Brown

In Conversation: Lemn Sissay On His New Book About Re-claiming the Ethiopian Heritage Stolen From Him by England’s Foster Care System

In 'My Name Is Why,' the 2019 PEN Pinter award winner passionately advocates for children in the institutional care system, and in turn tells a unique story of identity and the power in discovering one's heritage.

It took the author Lemn Sissay almost two decades to learn his real name. As an Ethiopian child growing up in England's care system, his cultural identity was systematically stripped from him at an early age. "For the first 18 years of my life I thought that my name was Norman," Sissay tells OkayAfrica. "I didn't meet a person of color until I was 10 years of age. I didn't know a person of color until I was 16. I didn't know I was Ethiopian until I was 16 years of age. They stole the memory of me from me. That is a land grab, you know? That is post-colonial, hallucinatory madness."

Sissay was not alone in this experience. As he notes in his powerful new memoir My Name Is Why, during the 1960s, tens of thousands of children in the UK were taken from their parents under dubious circumstances and put up for adoption. Sometimes, these placements were a matter of need, but other times, as was the case with Sissay, it was a result of the system preying on vulnerable parents. His case records, which he obtained in 2015 after a hardfought 30 year campaign, show that his mother was a victim of child "harvesting," in which young, single women were often forced into giving their children up for adoption before being sent back to their native countries. She tried to regain custody of young Sissay, but was unsuccessful.

Whether they end up in the foster system out of need or by mistake, Sissay says that most institutionalized children face the same fate of abuse under an inadequate and mismanaged system that fails to recognize their full humanity. For black children who are sent to white homes, it often means detachment from a culturally-sensitive environment. "There are too many brilliant people that I know who have been adopted by white parents for me to say that it just doesn't work," says Sissay. "But the problem is the amount of children that it doesn't work for."

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