Sports
Photo by Joosep Martinson - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images.

FIFA Secretary General Fatma Samoura Has Been Named 'General Delegate for Africa' To Implement Reform in the CAF

Samoura's short-term appointment is the Confederation of African Football's attempt to improve governance and administration in the organization.

FIFA and the Confederation of African Football (CAF) have announced a plan to implement the improvement of governance, transparency and administration in the organization, BBC Sport reports.

In a proposal from CAF President Ahmad Ahmad, Fatma Samoura's duties as FIFA's secretary general will now coincide with her appointment as FIFA General Delegate for Africa for 6 months beginning August 1.


The Executive Committee gathered in Cairo Wednesday to seek the global football association's insights to assess the CAF's current issues regarding corruption and breach of trust. Samoura's new appointment will ensure that the CAF will move forward with transparency and efficiency, with approval of FIFA's President, according to a statement.

Senegal's own Samoura will partner with Ahmad and collaborate with experts to oversee operational management of CAF, the ensure the efficient and professional organization of all competitions in the governing body and to support the growth and development of football in all countries and regions of CAF.

FIFA and CAF have also agreed to conduct a full forensic audit of the African governing body.

In order for Samoura to oversee this undertaking, FIFA has approved for her to delegate her roles as secretary general within the association's internal regulations. The appointment is set to conclude by the end of January 2020, though it may be renewed by both organizations.

This measure from FIFA and CAF came to be as Ahmad has been under scrutiny as of late, from being questioned by French authorities to the controversy linked to the African Champions League final, as well as the schedule for the 2019, 2021 and 2023 AFCON finals.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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