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The Lagos FilmLAB is a New Initiative for Aspiring Filmmakers

The initiative aims to support 12 teams of emerging talent in Lagos through an intensive residential program.

Nollywood is a billion-dollar industry that produces at least 50 movies a week—the second highest output in the world. Nigeria is undoubtedly invested in supporting aspiring filmmakers who will eventually contribute to both the local and international film industry. With that in mind, the British Council and the Lagos State Employment Trust Fund (LSETF) have partnered up with Biola Alabi Media and Creative England to create the Lagos FilmLAB, an initiative that will support emerging talent with the hopes of improving the overall quality of films and increase the revenue they generate.


The Lagos FilmLAB will be selecting 12 teams of emerging talent in the Lagos State throughout September. Thereafter, the chosen candidates will participate in an intensive residential program that will teach them about script development, production, marketing, financing and a number of other important aspects that are a crucial part of the film-making process. The candidates will be mentored by seasoned film executives and several other professionals in the industry. Seminars and workshops will also be open to those looking to improve their skills and expertise in the film industry.

Speaking about the new initiative, the acting executive secretary of the LSETF, Teju Abisoye, said that, "As a partner for the maiden edition of this Creative Sector initiative, we are convinced this collaboration further defines our commitment to job creation through relevant and appropriate skills that support the Creative Sector in Lagos State and in particular film production." He added that, "Finally we expect that a new tribe of world-class filmmakers would emerge to further contribute to the depth of quality and growth of the Creative Industry in Lagos State."

You can apply or read more about the Lagos FilmLAB here.

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Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

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Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.